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The Campylobacter jejuni oxidative stress regulator RrpB is associated with a genomic hypervariable region and altered oxidative stress resistance

Gundogdu, O, da Silva, DT, Mohammad, B, Elmi, A, Wren, BW, van Vliet, Arnoud and Dorrell, N (2016) The Campylobacter jejuni oxidative stress regulator RrpB is associated with a genomic hypervariable region and altered oxidative stress resistance Frontiers in Microbiology, 7 (2117), 227256.

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Abstract

Campylobacter jejuni is the leading cause of bacterial foodborne diarrhoeal disease worldwide. Despite the microaerophilic nature of the bacterium, C. jejuni can survive the atmospheric oxygen conditions in the environment. Bacteria that can survive either within a host or in the environment like C. jejuni require variable responses to survive the stresses associated with exposure to different levels of reactive oxygen species. The MarR-type transcriptional regulators RrpA and RrpB have recently been shown to play a role in controlling both the C. jejuni oxidative and aerobic stress responses. Analysis of 3,746 Campylobacter jejuni and 486 Campylobacter coli genome sequences showed that whilst rrpA is present in over 99% of C. jejuni strains, the presence of rrpB is restricted and appears to correlate with specific MLST clonal complexes (predominantly ST-21 and ST-61). C. coli strains in contrast lack both rrpA and rrpB. In C. jejuni rrpB+ strains, the rrpB gene is located within a variable genomic region containing the IF subtype of the type I Restriction-Modification (hsd) system, whilst this variable genomic region in C. jejuni rrpB- strains contains the IAB subtype hsd system and not the rrpB gene. C. jejuni rrpB- strains exhibit greater resistance to peroxide and aerobic stress than C. jejuni rrpB+ strains. Inactivation of rrpA resulted in increased sensitivity to peroxide stress in rrpB+ strains, but not in rrpB- strains. Mutation of rrpA resulted in reduced killing of Galleria mellonella larvae and enhanced biofilm formation independent of rrpB status. The oxidative and aerobic stress responses of rrpB- and rrpB+ strains suggest adaptation of C. jejuni within different hosts and niches that can be linked to specific MLST clonal complexes.

Item Type: Article
Subjects : Veterinary Medicine
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Veterinary Medicine
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Gundogdu, OUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
da Silva, DTUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Mohammad, BUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Elmi, AUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Wren, BWUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
van Vliet, Arnouda.vanvliet@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Dorrell, NUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : 26 December 2016
Identification Number : 10.3389/fmicb.2016.02117
Copyright Disclaimer : Copyright © 2016 Gundogdu, da Silva, Mohammad, Elmi, Wren, van Vliet and Dorrell. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.
Uncontrolled Keywords : Campylobacter jejuni Oxidative stress response regulation Aerobic stress response regulation Transcription factors Restriction modification system
Related URLs :
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 03 Jan 2017 15:03
Last Modified : 07 Jul 2017 11:14
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/813184

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