University of Surrey

Test tubes in the lab Research in the ATI Dance Research

Source-Gated Transistors Based on Solution Processed Silicon Nanowires for Low Power Applications

Shkunov, Maxim (2016) Source-Gated Transistors Based on Solution Processed Silicon Nanowires for Low Power Applications Advanced Electronic Materials, 3 (1), 1600256.

[img] Text
SGT_Si_NW_manuscript.pdf - Author's Original
Restricted to Repository staff only until 14 June 2018.
Available under License : See the attached licence file.

Download (2MB)
[img]
Preview
Text (licence)
SRI_deposit_agreement.pdf
Available under License : See the attached licence file.

Download (33kB) | Preview

Abstract

The solution-based assembly of field-effect transistors using nanowire inks, processed at low temperatures, offers an enormous potential for low power applications envisioned for the “Internet of Things,” including power management sensor circuits and electronics for in vivo bioimplants. Such low-temperature assembly, however, yields substantial contact potential barriers, with limited capacity for high current applications. In this study, the Schottky effect in a specific transistor configuration is utilized to achieve much reduced power consumption, with low saturation voltages (≈1 V), with relatively thick 230-nm SiO2 dielectrics. These source-gated transistors (SGTs) employ solution-deposited silicon nanowire arrays. A range of metal electrode work functions are investigated as device contacts and SGT operation is realized only in the structures with high source contact barriers. Such devices show very early drain current pinch-off, abruptly saturating at low drain voltages. The authors show that drain-current modulation is achieved via the gate field acting on the source barrier and lowering it through image force effects. Activation energy measurements reveal gate-induced source barrier lowering of ≈3 meV V−1. Numerical simulations show excellent correlation with the experimental data. These features, coupled with flat current saturation characteristics, are ideal for a range of low power applications, including wearable electronics and autonomous systems.

Item Type: Article
Subjects : Electronic Engineering
Divisions : Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences > Electronic Engineering > Advanced Technology Institute > Nano-Electronics Centre
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Shkunov, MaximM.Shkunov@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Date : 14 December 2016
Identification Number : 10.1002/aelm.201600256
Copyright Disclaimer : This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: C. Opoku, R. A. Sporea, V. Stolojan, S. R. P. Silva, M. Shkunov, Adv. Electron. Mater. 2017, 3, 1600256 which has been published in final form at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/aelm.201600256/full. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.
Related URLs :
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 28 Feb 2017 19:03
Last Modified : 31 Oct 2017 19:02
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/813182

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year


Information about this web site

© The University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH, United Kingdom.
+44 (0)1483 300800