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Density of high area-to-mass objects in Geostationary and Medium Earth orbits through semi-analytical equations and differential algebra

Wittig, A, Colombo, C and Armellin, R (2015) Density of high area-to-mass objects in Geostationary and Medium Earth orbits through semi-analytical equations and differential algebra In: 65th International Astronautical Congress 2014 (IAC 2014), 2014-09-29 - 2014-10-03, Toronto, Canada.

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Abstract

This paper introduces and combines two novel techniques. Firstly, we introduce an efficient numerical method for the propagation of entire sets of initial conditions in the phase space and their associated phase space densities based on Differential Algebra (DA) techniques. Secondly, this DA density propagator is applied to a DA-enabled implementation of Semi-Analytical (SA) averaged dynamics, combining for the first time the power of the SA and DA techniques. While the DA-based method for the propagation of densities introduced in this paper is independent of the dynamical system under consideration, the particular combination of DA techniques with SA equations yields a fast and accurate method to propagate large clouds of initial conditions and their associated probability density functions very efficiently for long time. This enables the study of the long-term behavior of particles subjected to the given dynamics. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method, the evolution of a cloud of high area-to-mass objects in Medium Earth Orbit is reproduced considering the effects of solar radiation pressure, the Earth’s oblateness and luni-solar perturbations. The computational efficiency is demonstrated by propagating 10; 000 random samples taking snapshots of their state and density at evenly spaced intervals throughout the integration. The total time required for a propagation for 16 years in the dynamics is on the order of tens of seconds on a common desktop PC.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Conference Paper)
Subjects : Electronic Engineering
Divisions : Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences > Electronic Engineering
Authors :
AuthorsEmailORCID
Wittig, AUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Colombo, CUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Armellin, RUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : May 2015
Copyright Disclaimer : © 2014 by A. Wittig, C. Colombo, R. Armellin. Published by the IAF, with permission and released to the IAF to publish in all forms.
Contributors :
ContributionNameEmailORCID
PublisherCurran Associates, Inc., UNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Related URLs :
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 05 Dec 2016 14:38
Last Modified : 05 Dec 2016 15:15
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/813040

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