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pH-Switchable Stratification of Colloidal Coatings: Surfaces “On Demand”

Martin-Fabiani, I, Fortini, Andrea, Lesage de la Haye, J, Koh, ML, Taylor, Spencer, Bourgeat-Lami, E, Lansalot, M, D’Agosto, F, Sear, Richard and Keddie, Joseph (2016) pH-Switchable Stratification of Colloidal Coatings: Surfaces “On Demand” ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, 8 (50). pp. 34755-34761.

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Abstract

Stratified coatings are used to provide properties at a surface, such as hardness or refractive index, which are different from underlying layers. Although time-savings are offered by self-assembly approaches, there have been no methods yet reported to offer stratification on demand. Here, we demonstrate a strategy to create self-assembled stratified coatings, which can be switched to homogenous structures when required. We use blends of large and small colloidal polymer particle dispersions in water that self-assemble during drying because of an osmotic pressure gradient that leads to a downward velocity of larger particles. Our confocal fluorescent microscopy images reveal a distinct surface layer created by the small particles. When the pH of the initial dispersion is raised, the hydrophilic shells of the small particles swell substantially, and the stratification is switched off. Brownian dynamics simulations explain the suppression of stratifi-cation when the small particles are swollen as a result of reduced particle mobility, a drop in the pressure gradient, and less time available before particle jamming. Our strategy paves the way for applications in antireflection films and pro-tective coatings in which the required surface composition can be achieved on demand, simply by adjusting the pH prior to deposition.

Item Type: Article
Subjects : Physics
Divisions : Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences > Physics
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Martin-Fabiani, IUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Fortini, Andreaa.fortini@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Lesage de la Haye, JUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Koh, MLUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Taylor, SpencerS.Taylor@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Bourgeat-Lami, EUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Lansalot, MUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
D’Agosto, FUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Sear, RichardR.Sear@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Keddie, JosephJ.Keddie@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Date : 29 December 2016
Funders : EC FP7
Identification Number : 10.1021/acsami.6b12015
Grant Title : Barrier-Plus
Copyright Disclaimer : Copyright 2016 American Chemical Society
Uncontrolled Keywords : Brownian dynamics simulations, stratification, polymerization-induced self-assembly (PISA), stimuli-responsive, functional coatings
Related URLs :
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 20 Dec 2016 10:19
Last Modified : 25 Aug 2017 11:40
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/813014

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