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Effect of vehicular traffic, remote sources and new particle formation on the activation properties of cloud condensation nuclei in the megacity of São Paulo, Brazil

Souto-Oliveira, CE, Andrade, M, Kumar, Prashant, da Silva Lopes, FJ, Babinski, M and Landulfo, E (2016) Effect of vehicular traffic, remote sources and new particle formation on the activation properties of cloud condensation nuclei in the megacity of São Paulo, Brazil Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 16 (22). pp. 14635-14656.

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Abstract

Atmospheric aerosol is the most important source of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Microphysics and chemical composition of aerosols can affect cloud development and precipitation process. Only a few studies in Latin American have reported the impact of urban aerosol on CCN activation parameters such as activated ratio (AR) and activation diameter (Dact). Sao Paulo Metropolitan Area (SPMA) is the biggest megacity of South America with over 20 million inhabitants. This is the first study in a megacity on South America to assess the impact of remote sources and new particle formation (NPF) events on CCN activation properties. The measurements were conducted at São Paulo city from August to September 2014. The CCN were measured within the 0.2–1.0% range of supersaturation, simultaneous with particle number concentration (PNC) and distribution (PND), trace elemental concentrations (TEC) and black carbon (BC). The NPF events were identified during 35% of the sampling days. Combination of TEC and BC associated with aerosol profile from Lidar analysis and Hysplit trajectories allowed to identify sea-salt and biomass burning contribution from remote regions as 28% and 21% of total number of days, respectively. The AR and Dact parameters presented a clearly different pattern for diurnal and nocturnal periods. The diurnal periods presented lower CCN activation than the nocturnal durations and this pattern was found to be associated mainly with local vehicular traffic emissions. NPF events showed a negative feedback to CCN activation. Weak effects of sea-salt and biomass burning aerosols could be observed on activation parameters as sea-salt showed a positive feedback. The results of this study show that particulate matter from local traffic emissions has the main effect on activation parameters compared with remote sources

Item Type: Article
Subjects : Civil & Environmental Engineering
Divisions : Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences > Civil and Environmental Engineering
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Souto-Oliveira, CEUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Andrade, MUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Kumar, PrashantP.Kumar@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
da Silva Lopes, FJUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Babinski, MUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Landulfo, EUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : 24 November 2016
Identification Number : 10.5194/acp-16-14635-2016
Copyright Disclaimer : Copyright The Author(s) 2016. CC-BY 3.0 License. Published by Copernicus Publications on behalf of the European Geosciences Union.
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 04 Nov 2016 09:46
Last Modified : 07 Jul 2017 13:17
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/812739

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