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Survivorship care and support following treatment for breast cancer: a multi-ethnic comparative qualitative study of women’s experiences

Tompkins, C, Scanlon, K, Scott, E, Ream, Emma, Harding, S and Armes, Jo (2016) Survivorship care and support following treatment for breast cancer: a multi-ethnic comparative qualitative study of women’s experiences BMC Health Services Research, 16 (401).

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Abstract

Background: As the number of breast cancer survivors continues to rise, Western populations become more ethnically and socially diverse and healthcare resources become ever-more stretched, follow-up that focuses on monitoring for recurrence is no longer viable. New models of survivorship care need to ensure they support selfmanagement and are culturally appropriate across diverse populations. This study explored experiences and expectations of a multi-ethnic sample of women with breast cancer regarding post-treatment care, in order to understand potential barriers to receiving care and inform new models of survivorship care.

Methods: A phenomenological qualitative research design was employed. In-depth interviews were conducted with women from diverse socio-demographic backgrounds in England, who completed treatment for breast cancer in the 12 months prior to the study. Data were analysed using Framework Analysis.

Results: Sixty-six women participated and reported expectations and needs were unmet at follow-up. Whilst there were more commonalities in experiences, discernible differences, particularly by ethnicity and age, were identified relating to three key themes: emotional responses on transition to follow-up; challenges communicating with healthcare professionals at follow-up; and challenges finding and accessing information and support services to address unmet needs.

Conclusions: There are cultural differences in the way healthcare professionals and women communicate, not necessarily differences in their post-treatment needs. We do not know if new models of care meet survivors’ needs, or if they are appropriate for everyone. Further testing and potential cultural and linguistic adaptation of models of care is necessary to ensure their appropriateness and acceptability to survivors from different backgrounds. New ways of providing survivorship care mean survivors will need to be better prepared for the post-treatment period and the role they will have to play in managing their symptoms and care.

Item Type: Article
Subjects : Health Sciences
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Health Sciences
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Tompkins, CUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Scanlon, KUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Scott, EUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Ream, Emmae.ream@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Harding, SUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Armes, Jojo.armes@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Date : 18 August 2016
Identification Number : 10.1186/s12913-016-1625-x
Copyright Disclaimer : © The Author(s). 2016. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
Uncontrolled Keywords : Breast cancer; Multi-ethnic; Survivorship care; Follow-up; Aftercare; Qualitative
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 01 Nov 2016 11:36
Last Modified : 31 Oct 2017 18:52
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/812696

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