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Thyroglobulin as a functional biomarker of iodine status in a cohort study of pregnant women in the United Kingdom

Bath, SC, Pop, VJM, Furmidge-Owen, VL, Broeren, MAC and Rayman, MP (2016) Thyroglobulin as a functional biomarker of iodine status in a cohort study of pregnant women in the United Kingdom Thyroid.

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Abstract

Background Though iodine deficiency in pregnancy is a matter of public-health concern, a functional measure of iodine status is lacking. The thyroid-specific protein, thyroglobulin (Tg), which reflects thyroid size, has shown promise as a functional measure in studies of children and adults, but data in pregnancy are sparse. In a cohort of mildly-to-moderately iodine-deficient pregnant women, we aimed to explore whether serum Tg is a sensitive functional biomarker of iodine status and to examine longitudinal change in Tg with gestational age. Method 230 pregnant women were recruited at an ante-natal clinic at 12 weeks of gestation to the Selenium in PRegnancy INTervention (SPRINT) study, in Oxford, UK. Repeated measures of urinary iodine-to-creatinine ratio, serum TSH and Tg at 12, 20, and 35 weeks of gestation were collected. Women were dichotomised by their iodine-to-creatinine ratio, (<150 or ≥150 μg/g) to group them broadly as iodine-deficient or iodine-sufficient. Women with thyroid antibodies were excluded; data and samples were available for 191 women. Results Median Tg concentration was 21, 19, and 23 μg/L in the first, second, and third trimesters, respectively. In a linear mixed model, controlling for confounders, Tg was higher in the <150 μg/g than in the ≥150 μg/g group (p<0.001) but there was no difference in TSH (p=0.27). Gestational week modified the effect of iodine status on TSH (p=0.01) and Tg (p=0.012); Tg did not increase with gestational week in the ≥150 μg/g group but did in the <150 μg/g group, and TSH increased more steeply in the <150 μg/g group. Conclusions Low iodine status (<150 μg/g) in pregnancy is associated with higher serum Tg, suggesting that the thyroid is hyper-stimulated by iodine deficiency, which causes it to enlarge. Tg is a more sensitive biomarker of iodine status in pregnancy than is TSH.

Item Type: Article
Subjects : Medical Science
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Bath, SCUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Pop, VJMUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Furmidge-Owen, VLUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Broeren, MACUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Rayman, MPUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : 18 November 2016
Identification Number : 10.1089/thy.2016.0322
Copyright Disclaimer : Copyright: Sarah C. Bath et al., 2016; Published by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. This Open Access article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly credited.
Uncontrolled Keywords : Iodine, thyroglobulin, pregnancy, thyroid, nutrition
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 25 Oct 2016 11:29
Last Modified : 21 Dec 2016 15:38
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/812589

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