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Is Work-related Rumination Associated with deficits in Executive Functioning?

Cropley, M, Zijlstra, FRH, Querstret, D and Beck, S (2016) Is Work-related Rumination Associated with deficits in Executive Functioning? Frontiers in Psychology, 7, 1524.

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Abstract

Work-related rumination, that is, perseverative thinking about work during leisure time, has been associated with a range of negative health and wellbeing issues. The present paper examined the association between work-related rumination and cognitive processes centred around the theoretical construct of executive functioning. Executive functioning is an umbrella term for high level cognitive processes such as planning, working memory, inhibition, mental flexibility; and it underlies how people manage and regulate their goal directed behaviour. Three studies are reported. Study I, reports the results of a cross-sectional study of 240 employees, and demonstrates significant correlations between work-related rumination and three proxy measures of executive functioning: cognitive failures (.33), cognitive flexibility (-.24) and situational awareness at work (-.28). Study II (n = 939), expands on the findings from study 1 and demonstrates that workers reporting medium and high work-related rumination were 2.8 and 5 times, respectively, more likely to report cognitive failures relative to low ruminators. High ruminators also demonstrated greater difficulties with ‘lapses of attention’ (OR = 4.8), ‘lack of focus of attention’ (OR = 3.4), and ‘absent mindedness’ (OR = 4.3). The final study, examined the association between work-related rumination and executive functioning using interview data from 2460 full time workers. Workers were divided into tertiles low, medium and high. The findings showed that high work-related rumination was associated with deficits in starting (OR = 2.3) and finishing projects (OR = 2.4), fidgeting (OR = 1.9), memory (OR = 2.2), pursuing tasks in order (OR = 1.8), and feeling compelled to do things (OR = 2.0). It was argued that work-related rumination may not be related to work demands per se, but appears to be an executive functioning/control issue. Such findings are important for the design and delivery of intervention programmes aimed at helping people to switch off and unwind from work

Item Type: Article
Subjects : Psychology
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Psychology
Authors :
AuthorsEmailORCID
Cropley, MUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Zijlstra, FRHUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Querstret, DUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Beck, SUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : 30 September 2016
Identification Number : https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2016.01524
Copyright Disclaimer : Copyright © 2016 Cropley, Zijlstra, Querstret and Beck. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.
Uncontrolled Keywords : Work-related rumination, executive functioning, recovery, cognitive failures, psychological detachment
Related URLs :
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 21 Sep 2016 16:51
Last Modified : 01 Dec 2016 09:29
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/812281

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