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The value of being a conscientious learner: Examining the effects of the Big Five personality traits on self-reported learning from training

Woods, Stephen, Patterson, FC, Koczwara, A and Sofat, JA (2016) The value of being a conscientious learner: Examining the effects of the Big Five personality traits on self-reported learning from training Journal of Workplace Learning: employee counselling today, 28 (7). pp. 424-434.

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Abstract

Purpose – The aim of this paper is to examine the impact of personality traits of the Big Five model on training outcomes to help explain variation in training effectiveness. Design/methodology/approach – Associations of the Big Five with self-reported learning following training were tested in a pre- and post-design in a field sample of junior medical practitioners (N 99), who attended a training workshop on self-awareness. Associations are reported of personality traits with post-training learning measured immediately following the workshop and one-month later controlling for pre-training learning. Findings – Conscientiousness was related to post-training learning at both times. None of the remaining Big Five factors were associated with post-training learning. Research limitations/implications – The study contributes to the literature on personality and training outcomes, clarifying the associations of traits with outcomes in a pre-and-post design. Although the study sample has limitations, the findings have implications for numerous lines of future research, in particular in understanding the role of training in relations of personality and job performance. Practical implications – Practitioners should consider ways to encourage training participants to approach training conscientiously. Personality assessment might help people reflect on their approach to learning to adapt it during training. Originality/value – No study has previously examined the role of personality traits in training outcomes using a pre- and post-design. The role of conscientiousness in workplace learning is underlined by the findings. While dimensions such as openness and extraversion may encourage people to participate in training, conscientiousness may make the difference in promoting internalized individual development and change following training.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences > Surrey Business School
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Woods, Stephens.a.woods@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Patterson, FCUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Koczwara, AUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Sofat, JAUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : August 2016
Identification Number : 10.1108/JWL-10-2015-0073
Copyright Disclaimer : © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 16 Sep 2016 14:26
Last Modified : 03 Oct 2017 08:28
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/812208

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