University of Surrey

Test tubes in the lab Research in the ATI Dance Research

Source apportionment of BTEX compounds in Tehran, Iran using UNMIX receptor model

Dehghani, MH, Sanaei, D, Nabizadeh, R, Nazmara, S and Kumar, Prashant (2016) Source apportionment of BTEX compounds in Tehran, Iran using UNMIX receptor model Air Quality, Atmosphere and Health, 10 (2). pp. 225-234.

[img] Text
Unmix receptor model_PK3 Final second.pdf - Accepted version Manuscript
Restricted to Repository staff only until 13 September 2017.
Available under License : See the attached licence file.

Download (1MB)
[img]
Preview
Text (licence)
SRI_deposit_agreement.pdf
Available under License : See the attached licence file.

Download (33kB) | Preview

Abstract

Understanding the distribution levels and sources of volatile organic compounds (VOC), mainly benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes (BTEX), in the ambient atmosphere is important for efficiently managing and implementing the associated control strategies. We measured BTEX compounds at an industrial location in the west Tehran city (Iran), which is highly influenced by industrial activities and traffic during the winter and spring seasons during 2014-2015. A multivariate receptor model, UNMIX, was applied on the measured data for the identification of the sources and their contributions to BTEX compounds in a highly industrialised and trafficked atmospheric environment of Tehran city. Three main groups of sources were identified. These included solvent and painting sources (e.g. vehicle manufacturing), motorised road vehicles and mixed origin sources. While the solvent and painting sources and vehicle exhaust emissions contributed to about 5 and 29% of total BTEX mass, respectively, the mixed origin source contributed to about two-third (~66%) of the remaining mass. These mixed origin sources included rubber and plastic manufacturing (39%), leather industries (28%) and the unknown sources (33%). The mean concentrations of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and average xylene(o, p,m) compounds were measured as 28.96±9.12 µg m –3 , 29.55±9.73 µg m –3 , 28.61±12.2 µg/m-3 and 25.68±10.58 µg m–3 , respectively. A high correlation coefficient (R 2 >0.94) was also found between predicted (modelled) and measured concentrations for each sample. Further analyses from UNMIX receptor model showed that the average weekday contributions of BTEX compounds were significantly higher during winter compared with those during spring. This higher concentration during winter may be attributed to calm wind conditions and high stability of the atmosphere, along with the after effect of government policies on the use of cleaner fuel in refineries that became operational in winter 2014

Item Type: Article
Subjects : Civil & Environmental Engineering
Divisions : Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences > Civil and Environmental Engineering
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Dehghani, MHUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Sanaei, DUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Nabizadeh, RUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Nazmara, SUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Kumar, PrashantP.Kumar@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Date : 13 September 2016
Identification Number : 10.1007/s11869-016-0425-0
Copyright Disclaimer : The final publication is available at Springer via http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11869-016-0425-0
Uncontrolled Keywords : Source apportionment; BTEX compounds; UNMIX Receptor model; Urban environment; Tehran air quality
Related URLs :
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 16 Sep 2016 13:58
Last Modified : 11 Jul 2017 09:28
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/812206

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year


Information about this web site

© The University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH, United Kingdom.
+44 (0)1483 300800