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An Analysis of Childhood Malnutrition in Rural India: Role of Gender, Income and Other Household Characteristics

Pal, S (1999) An Analysis of Childhood Malnutrition in Rural India: Role of Gender, Income and Other Household Characteristics World Development, 27 (7). pp. 1151-1171.

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Abstract

There are controversies regarding the role of individual and household characteristics in childhood nutritional status measured by anthropometric indicators. Using a nutrition index based on weight-for-age of children in rural India, the paper re-examines this issue. Ordered probit estimates of nutritional status suggest female literacy improves the nutritional status of boys at the cost of girls while higher per capita current income improves that of both boys and girls, though the impact is higher for boys; however, effect of income is not robust when we use instruments of longer-run income. But more income and literacy give more ways to discriminate between boys and girls.

Item Type: Article
Subjects : Economics
Divisions : Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences > Surrey Business School
Authors :
AuthorsEmailORCID
Pal, SUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : July 1999
Identification Number : https://doi.org/10.1016/S0305-750X(99)00048-0
Copyright Disclaimer : © 1999. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
Additional Information : Full text not available from this repository.
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 13 Sep 2016 17:50
Last Modified : 13 Sep 2016 17:50
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/812159

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