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Specialist nurse key worker in children's cancer care: professionals' perspectives on the core characteristics of the role

Martins, A, Aldiss, Susie and Gibson, Faith (2016) Specialist nurse key worker in children's cancer care: professionals' perspectives on the core characteristics of the role European Journal of Oncology Nursing (EJON), 24. pp. 70-78.

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Abstract

Purpose: To describe the development and implementation of the specialist nurse key worker  role across 18 children’s cancer centres in the United Kingdom, and draw out significant factors  for success to inform future development of the role across a range of specialities.  Method: Data were obtained through 42 semi‐structured interviews and a focus group with 12  key workers. Framework analysis revealed two main themes: models of care and key workers’  perspectives of the role.  Results: Four models of care were identified and described, roles were organised along a  continuum of in reach and outreach with either the presence or absence of home visits and  direct delivery of clinical care. Key workers’ perspectives of the advantages of the role included:  coordination of care (being the main point of contact for families/professionals), experience  and expertise (communication/information) and the relationship with families. The main  challenges identified were: time, caseload size, geographical area covered, staffing numbers  and resources available in the hospital and community.  Conclusion: The label ‘key worker’ was disliked by many participants, as the loss of ‘specialist  nurse’ in the title failed to reflect professional group. Leaving aside terminology, key workers  shared core role elements within a continuum of in reach and outreach work and their  involvement in direct clinical care varied throughout the pathway. Irrespective of the model  they worked in, the key worker provided clinical, emotional, educational, and practical support  to families, through the coordination of care, experience and expertise and relationship with  families and professionals.

Item Type: Article
Subjects : Health Sciences
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Health Sciences
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Martins, AUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Aldiss, Susies.aldiss@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Gibson, Faithf.gibson@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Date : 25 September 2016
Identification Number : 10.1016/j.ejon.2016.08.009
Copyright Disclaimer : © 2016. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
Uncontrolled Keywords : key worker; nurse specialist; care provision; children; qualitative data
Related URLs :
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 13 Sep 2016 08:11
Last Modified : 27 Jul 2017 13:21
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/812116

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