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DEM-CFD analysis of contact electrification and electrostatic interactions during fluidization

Pei, C, Wu, C and Adams, M (2016) DEM-CFD analysis of contact electrification and electrostatic interactions during fluidization Powder Technology.

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Abstract

Contact electrification and electrostatic interactions often occur in the fluidization process, which can significantly influence the dynamic behaviour of particles and the fluidization performance. In this study, a discrete element method coupled with computational fluid dynamics (DEM-CFD) is developed by implementing contact electrification and electrostatic interaction models and the combined effects of contact electrification and electrostatic interaction on fluidization are analysed. It is found that the charge of the particle system increase with the superficial gas velocity. Particles of different material properties (especially work function) can be bi-charged and form agglomerates. At low superficial gas velocities, the particle bed cannot be fully fluidized and the pressure drop tends to be stable rather than fluctuating as the gas flows through the micro-channels of agglomerates. However, at high superficial gas velocities, the agglomerates can break, inducing strong fluctuation of pressure drop. Clearly, the electrostatic phenomena and fluidization behaviour can mutually influence each other during the process.

Item Type: Article
Subjects : Chemical and Process Engineering
Divisions : Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences > Chemical and Process Engineering
Authors :
AuthorsEmailORCID
Pei, CUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Wu, CUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Adams, MUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : 12 August 2016
Identification Number : 10.1016/j.powtec.2016.08.030
Copyright Disclaimer : © 2016. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 31 Aug 2016 13:15
Last Modified : 31 Aug 2016 13:15
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/811926

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