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Change, stability and authority : the prospects for human resource development in two KSA public organisations.

Radwan, Tahir A. (2016) Change, stability and authority : the prospects for human resource development in two KSA public organisations. Doctoral thesis, University of Surrey.

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Abstract

The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) faces continuous challenges in meeting the demands of a growing economy and the impacts of globalization. This is especially the case in the public sector where a combination of economic restructuring, demographic change and public scrutiny are producing challenges for organization and service. This highlights the importance of Human Resource Development (HRD) as a means of responding to and designing individual and organisational change – as a predominantly human process. This thesis examines two public organizations in KSA and the way in which they organize their management and HRD and understand the challenge of change. It begins by examining the literature on change and its relationship to theories of management, organization and HRD. It is shown that the relationship between change and HRD is relatively unexplored empirically in the context of developing economies. A framework of key constructs is developed to enable such an exploration. The empirical research adopts a mixture of qualitative and quantitative methods to undertake a case study of two public organizations concerned with HRD policies. The research examines existing theories and attempts to produce new insights grounded in the data. It is concluded that there remains a legacy of hierarchical and bureaucratic control that draws upon patriarchal authority to maintain its stability. However, it is also shown that there appears to be considerable support from employees and managers for this style of management, in particular for a strong sense of sociability that, for a sizable minority of members, appears to be more important than organizational performance. This approach appears to be associated with a conservative approach to change and a reliance on senior managers to take responsibility for change decisions. However, it is also apparent that increasing management education and study abroad do seem to be causing sore erosion of these attitudes, although this appears to be a gradual process. The implications of this situation for dealing with possible radical future change are explored as are the lessons for theory within this context, and for future research.

Item Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Subjects : Human Resource Development
Divisions : Theses
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Radwan, Tahir A.alradwan01@hotmail.comUNSPECIFIED
Date : 21 December 2016
Funders : Saudi Arabian Cultural Bureau
Copyright Disclaimer : This thesis and the work to which it refers are the results of my own efforts. Any ideas, data, images or text resulting from the work of others (whether published or unpublished) are fully identified as such within the work and attributed to their originator in the text, bibliography or in footnotes. This thesis has not been submitted in whole or in part for any other academic degree or professional qualification. I agree that the University has the right to submit my work to the plagiarism detection service TurnitinUK for originality checks. Whether or not drafts have been so-assessed, the University reserves the right to require an electronic version of the final document (as submitted) for assessment as above.
Contributors :
ContributionNameEmailORCID
http://www.loc.gov/loc.terms/relators/THSGoss, DavidD.Goss@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Depositing User : Tahir Radwan
Date Deposited : 05 Jan 2017 08:44
Last Modified : 17 May 2017 14:25
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/811738

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