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Sensitivity of primary fibroblasts in culture to atmospheric oxygen does not correlate with species lifespan

Patrick, A, Seluanov, M, Hwang, C, Tam, J, Khan, T, Morgenstern, A, Wiener, L, Vazquez, JM, Zafar, H, Wen, R, Muratkalyeva, M, Doerig, K, Zagorulya, M, Cole, L, Catalano, S, Lobo Ladd, AAB, Coppi, A, Coşkun, Y, Tian, X, Ablaeva, J, Nevo, E, Gladyshev, VN, Zhang, ZD, Vijg, J, Seluanov, A and Gorbunova, V (2016) Sensitivity of primary fibroblasts in culture to atmospheric oxygen does not correlate with species lifespan Aging, 8 (5). pp. 841-847.

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Abstract

Differences in the way human and mouse fibroblasts experience senescence in culture had long puzzled researchers. While senescence of human cells is mediated by telomere shortening, Parrinello et al. demonstrated that senescence of mouse cells is caused by extreme oxygen sensitivity. It was hypothesized that the striking difference in oxygen sensitivity between mouse and human cells explains their different rates of aging. To test if this hypothesis is broadly applicable, we cultured cells from 16 rodent species with diverse lifespans in 3% and 21% oxygen and compared their growth rates. Unexpectedly, fibroblasts derived from laboratory mouse strains were the only cells demonstrating extreme sensitivity to oxygen. Cells from hamster, muskrat, woodchuck, capybara, blind mole rat, paca, squirrel, beaver, naked mole rat and wild‐caught mice were mildly sensitive to oxygen, while cells from rat, gerbil, deer mouse, chipmunk, guinea pig and chinchilla showed no difference in the growth rate between 3% and 21% oxygen. We conclude that, although the growth of primary fibroblasts is generally improved by maintaining cells in 3% oxygen, the extreme oxygen sensitivity is a peculiarity of laboratory mouse strains, possibly related to their very long telomeres, and fibroblast oxygen sensitivity does not directly correlate with species’ lifespan.

Item Type: Article
Subjects : Veterinary Medicine
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Veterinary Medicine
Authors :
AuthorsEmailORCID
Patrick, AUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Seluanov, MUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Hwang, CUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Tam, JUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Khan, TUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Morgenstern, AUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Wiener, LUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Vazquez, JMUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Zafar, HUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Wen, RUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Muratkalyeva, MUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Doerig, KUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Zagorulya, MUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Cole, LUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Catalano, SUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Lobo Ladd, AABUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Coppi, AUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Coşkun, YUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Tian, XUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Ablaeva, JUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Nevo, EUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Gladyshev, VNUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Zhang, ZDUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Vijg, JUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Seluanov, AUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Gorbunova, VUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : 5 July 2016
Identification Number : 10.18632/aging.100958
Copyright Disclaimer : Copyright 2016 Patrick et al. This is an open‐access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
Uncontrolled Keywords : fibroblasts, oxygen, senescence, human, rodents
Related URLs :
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 16 Aug 2016 09:30
Last Modified : 16 Aug 2016 09:30
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/811712

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