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Use of Atropine Penalization to Treat Amblyopia in UK Orthoptic Practice

Piano, M, O'Connor, AR and Newsham, D (2014) Use of Atropine Penalization to Treat Amblyopia in UK Orthoptic Practice Journal of pediatric ophthalmology and strabismus, 51 (6). pp. 363-369.

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Abstract

Purpose: To compare clinical practice patterns regarding atropine penalization use by UK orthoptists to the current evidence base and identify any existing barriers against use of AP as first-line treatment. Methods: An online survey was designed to assess current practice patterns of UK orthoptists using atropine penalization. They were asked to identify issues limiting their use of atropine penalization and give opinions on its effectiveness compared to occlusion. Descriptive statistics and content analysis were applied to the results. Results: Responses were obtained from 151 orthoptists throughout the United Kingdom. The main perceived barriers to use of atropine penalization were inability to prescribe atropine and supply difficulties. However, respondents also did not consider atropine penalization as effective as occlusion in treating amblyopia, contrary to recent research findings. Patient selection criteria and treatment administration largely follows current evidence. More orthoptists use atropine penalization as first-line treatment than previously reported. Conclusions: Practitioners tend to closely follow the current evidence base when using atropine penalization, but reluctance in offering it as first-line treatment or providing a choice for parents between occlusion and atropine still remains. This may result from concerns regarding atropine’s general efficacy, side effects, and risk of reverse amblyopia. Alternatively, as demonstrated in other areas of medicine, it may reflect the inherent delay of research

Item Type: Article
Subjects : Medical Science
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Health Sciences
Authors :
AuthorsEmailORCID
Piano, MUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
O'Connor, ARUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Newsham, DUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : 1 November 2014
Identification Number : 10.3928/01913913-20141021-08
Copyright Disclaimer : Copyright © SLACK Incorporated, 2014.
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 04 Aug 2016 14:33
Last Modified : 04 Aug 2016 14:33
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/811607

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