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In vitro models of cancer stem cells and clinical applications

Santos Franco, S, Szczesna, K, Iliou, MS, Al-Qahtani, M, Mobasheri, A, Kobolák, J and Dinnyes, A (2016) In vitro models of cancer stem cells and clinical applications BMC Genomics, 16 (Supp 2), 738.

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Abstract

Cancer cells, stem cells and cancer stem cells have for a long time played a significant role in the biomedical sciences. Though cancer therapy is more effective than it was a few years ago, the truth is that still none of the current non-surgical treatments can cure cancer effectively. The reason could be due to the subpopulation called “cancer stem cells” (CSCs), being defined as those cells within a tumour that have properties of stem cells: self-renewal and the ability for differentiation into multiple cell types that occur in tumours. The phenomenon of CSCs is based on their resistance to many of the current cancer therapies, which results in tumour relapse. Although further investigation regarding CSCs is still needed, there is already evidence that these cells may play an important role in the prognosis of cancer, progression and therapeutic strategy. Therefore, long-term patient survival may depend on the elimination of CSCs. Consequently, isolation of pure CSC populations or reprogramming of cancer cells into CSCs, from cancer cell lines or primary tumours, would be a useful tool to gain an in-depth knowledge about heterogeneity and plasticity of CSC phenotypes and therefore carcinogenesis. Herein, we will discuss current CSC models, methods used to characterize CSCs, candidate markers, characteristic signalling pathways and clinical applications of CSCs. Some examples of CSC-specific treatments that are currently in early clinical phases will also be presented in this review.

Item Type: Article
Subjects : Veterinary Medicine
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Veterinary Medicine
Authors :
AuthorsEmailORCID
Santos Franco, SUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Szczesna, KUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Iliou, MSUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Al-Qahtani, MUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Mobasheri, AUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Kobolák, JUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Dinnyes, AUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : 30 September 2016
Copyright Disclaimer : © 2016 The Author(s). Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated
Uncontrolled Keywords : cancer stem cells; cancer; in vitro models; cancer therapy.
Related URLs :
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 27 Jul 2016 09:46
Last Modified : 15 Nov 2016 12:23
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/811469

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