University of Surrey

Test tubes in the lab Research in the ATI Dance Research

Evaluation of robust, low energy wastewater treatment systems for small populations.

Wilson, Simon (2016) Evaluation of robust, low energy wastewater treatment systems for small populations. Doctoral thesis, University of Surrey.

[img]
Preview
Text
1.Thesis Coverpage_Simon Wilson.pdf
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial Share Alike.

Download (101kB) | Preview
[img]
Preview
Text
2.Executive Summary_Simon Wilson.pdf
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial Share Alike.

Download (175kB) | Preview
[img]
Preview
Text
3.Thesis_Simon Wilson.pdf - Version of Record
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial Share Alike.

Download (8MB) | Preview
[img] Archive
Thesis_Volume2_Monthly Reports_Simon Wilson_1458183.zip
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial Share Alike.

Download (74MB)
[img] Text
Wilson-2015.pdf - Version of Record
Restricted to Repository staff only
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial Share Alike.

Download (214kB)
[img] Archive
Thesis_Volume 1_PDF_Simon Wilson_1458183.zip
Restricted to Repository staff only
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial Share Alike.

Download (8MB)

Abstract

ABSTRACT The aim of this research is to evaluate the potential of low energy wastewater treatment processes to meet UK performance requirements, with respect to an increasingly strict regulatory framework This research proposes the implementation of double filtration trickling filters (TF) operating in series without the requirement for intermediate settlement. Performance data is analysed and presented to demonstrate how a 50-80% biological offload of organic carbon (BOD) using a primary plastic media TF can enhance nitrification of existing conventional TFs. This configuration is capable of providing 97.4%, ammoniacal nitrogen (NH4-N) removal with effluent concentrations as low as 1.2mg/L. Process performance data from 120 TF wastewater treatment works (WWTW) are analysed in order to evaluate the relative nitrification performance of TF WWTWs, both with and without aerated tertiary nitrifying processes. Multivariate regression analysis whilst considering flow, temperature and infiltration determines that tertiary nitrification contributes to a significantly higher risk of NH4-N consent being exceeded during colder winter periods. This directly challenges the current strategy of adopting tertiary processes for enhancing nitrification on TF WWTWs. A decentralised facultative aerated lagoon (FAL) system with novel mixing and point source aeration is investigated and evaluated to determine its suitability for offloading existing WWTWs. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modelling describes the systems complex hydrodynamics and is validated with an experimental tracer study. Overall, this study showed that low energy mixing is capable of preventing hydraulic short circuiting and thermal stratification, which are notorious for reduced performance in traditional waste stabilisation pond variants.

Item Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Subjects : Sustainability for Engineering & Energy Systems
Divisions : Theses
Authors :
AuthorsEmailORCID
Wilson, Simonsimon.wilson1985@yahoo.co.ukUNSPECIFIED
Date : 31 August 2016
Funders : EPSRC - Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council
Grant Title : Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council
Copyright Disclaimer : © 2016 Simon P. Wilson ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
Contributors :
ContributionNameEmailORCID
Thesis supervisorOuki, S.s.ouki@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Thesis supervisorSaroj, D.P.d.saroj@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Thesis supervisorPearce, P.petepearce@farmiloefisher.comUNSPECIFIED
Depositing User : Simon Wilson
Date Deposited : 06 Sep 2016 10:40
Last Modified : 06 Sep 2016 10:40
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/811248

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year


Information about this web site

© The University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH, United Kingdom.
+44 (0)1483 300800