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Phylogenomic approaches to determine the zoonotic potential of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) isolated from Zambian dairy cattle

Mainda, G, Lupolova, N, Sikakwa, L, Bessell, PR, Muma, JB, Hoyle, DV, McAteer, SP, Gibbs, K, Williams, NJ, Sheppard, SK, La Ragione, RM, Cordoni, G, Argyle, SA, Wagner, S, Chase-Topping, ME, Dallman, TJ, Stevens, MP, Bronsvoort, B and Gally, DL (2016) Phylogenomic approaches to determine the zoonotic potential of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) isolated from Zambian dairy cattle Scientific Reports, 6.

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Abstract

This study assessed the prevalence and zoonotic potential of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) sampled from 104 dairy units in the central region of Zambia and compared these with isolates from patients presenting with diarrhoea in the same region. A subset of 297 E. coli strains were sequenced allowing in silico analyses of phylo- and sero-groups. The majority of the bovine strains clustered in the B1 ‘commensal’ phylogroup (67%) and included a diverse array of serogroups. 11% (41/371) of the isolates from Zambian dairy cattle contained Shiga toxin genes (stx) while none (0/73) of the human isolates were positive. While the toxicity of a subset of these isolates was demonstrated, none of the randomly selected STEC belonged to key serogroups associated with human disease and none encoded a type 3 secretion system synonymous with typical enterohaemorrhagic strains. Positive selection for E. coli O157:H7 across the farms identified only one positive isolate again indicating this serotype is rare in these animals. In summary, while Stx-encoding E. coli strains are common in this dairy population, the majority of these strains are unlikely to cause disease in humans. However, the threat remains of the emergence of strains virulent to humans from this reservoir.

Item Type: Article
Subjects : Veterinary Medicine
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Veterinary Medicine
Authors :
AuthorsEmailORCID
Mainda, GUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Lupolova, NUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Sikakwa, LUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Bessell, PRUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Muma, JBUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Hoyle, DVUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
McAteer, SPUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Gibbs, KUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Williams, NJUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Sheppard, SKUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
La Ragione, RMUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Cordoni, GUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Argyle, SAUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Wagner, SUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Chase-Topping, MEUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Dallman, TJUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Stevens, MPUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Bronsvoort, BUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Gally, DLUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : 25 May 2016
Funders : Biotechnology & Biological Sciences Research Council
Identification Number : 10.1038/srep26589
Copyright Disclaimer : This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 13 Jul 2016 09:14
Last Modified : 13 Jul 2016 09:14
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/811196

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