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Using shared needles for subcutaneous inoculation can transmit bluetongue virus mechanically between ruminant hosts

Darpel, KE, Barber, J, Hope, A, Wilson, AJ, Gubbins, S, Henstock, M, Frost, L, Batten, C, Veronesi, E, Moffat, K, Carpenter, S, Oura, C, Mellor, PS and Mertens, PPC (2016) Using shared needles for subcutaneous inoculation can transmit bluetongue virus mechanically between ruminant hosts SCIENTIFIC REPORTS, 6, ARTN 20627.

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Abstract

Bluetongue virus (BTV) is an economically important arbovirus of ruminants that is transmitted by Culicoides spp. biting midges. BTV infection of ruminants results in a high viraemia, suggesting that repeated sharing of needles between animals could result in its iatrogenic transmission. Studies defining the risk of iatrogenic transmission of blood-borne pathogens by less invasive routes, such as subcutaneous or intradermal inoculations are rare, even though the sharing of needles is common practice for these inoculation routes in the veterinary sector. Here we demonstrate that BTV can be transmitted by needle sharing during subcutaneous inoculation, despite the absence of visible blood contamination of the needles. The incubation period, measured from sharing of needles, to detection of BTV in the recipient sheep or cattle, was substantially longer than has previously been reported after experimental infection of ruminants by either direct inoculation of virus, or through blood feeding by infected Culicoides. Although such mechanical transmission is most likely rare under field condition, these results are likely to influence future advice given in relation to sharing needles during veterinary vaccination campaigns and will also be of interest for the public health sector considering the risk of pathogen transmission during subcutaneous inoculations with re-used needles

Item Type: Article
Subjects : Veterinary Medicine
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Veterinary Medicine
Authors :
AuthorsEmailORCID
Darpel, KEUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Barber, JUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Hope, AUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Wilson, AJUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Gubbins, SUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Henstock, MUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Frost, LUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Batten, CUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Veronesi, EUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Moffat, KUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Carpenter, SUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Oura, CUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Mellor, PSUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Mertens, PPCUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : 8 February 2016
Identification Number : 10.1038/srep20627
Copyright Disclaimer : This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Uncontrolled Keywords : Science & Technology, Multidisciplinary Sciences, Science & Technology - Other Topics, BOVINE LEUKEMIA-VIRUS, VECTOR-BORNE TRANSMISSION, EQUINE INFECTIOUS-ANEMIA, HEALTH-CARE WORKERS, MOUTH-DISEASE VIRUS, SEROTYPE 8, LEUKOSIS VIRUS, CLINICAL SIGNS, CLIMATE-CHANGE, SHEEP
Related URLs :
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 07 Jul 2016 13:23
Last Modified : 07 Jul 2016 13:23
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/811141

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