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An action research study to explore the nature of the nurse consultant role in the care of children and young people.

Gregorowski, A, Brennan, E, Chapman, S, Gibson, F, Khair, K, May, L and Lindsay-Waters, A (2013) An action research study to explore the nature of the nurse consultant role in the care of children and young people. J Clin Nurs, 22 (1-2). pp. 201-210.

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Abstract

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: An action research study was undertaken to explore the development of the nurse consultant role when caring for children and young people. BACKGROUND: Five nurse consultants in different areas of specialist care in a tertiary paediatric hospital undertook the study when implementing the new role of nurse consultant into the hospital. METHODS: Action research meetings took place over a year. The nurse consultants then collated and analysed data using thematic analysis during the second year. A research fellow facilitated meetings, carried out participant observation, and coordinated the action research project. RESULTS: Data analysis revealed 22 subthemes grouped into four overarching themes: shaping the role; shaping child-centred care through consultancy; taking responsibility for practice; and leadership. These roles and their ease and complexity within the nurse consultant role are examined in further detail in this paper. Balancing the four key components in a newly developing role was initially complex and required support. Over time the nurse consultants developed the necessary skills to perform fully in all areas. A major challenge was developing the research role, a key function of the nurse consultant role. By the end of the study, all nurse consultants were actively embarking upon their own research either in preparation for or as part of Doctoral studies. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: While there are many similarities with nurse consultants in adult practice, one major difference was the nurse consultant role in supporting families when caring for children and young people. This meant having a three-way communication style: with the family, the child/young person, and other healthcare professionals. This communication style was observed by the research fellow in participant observation of the nurse consultants undertaking clinical care and is described further in the analysis of the role.

Item Type: Article
Subjects : Biosciences
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Biosciences and Medicine
Authors :
AuthorsEmailORCID
Gregorowski, AUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Brennan, EUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Chapman, SUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Gibson, FUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Khair, KUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
May, LUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Lindsay-Waters, AUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : January 2013
Identification Number : 10.1111/j.1365-2702.2012.04140.x
Copyright Disclaimer : This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Gregorowski, A, Brennan, E, Chapman, S, Gibson, F, Khair, K, May, L and Lindsay-Waters, A (2013) An action research study to explore the nature of the nurse consultant role in the care of children and young people. J Clin Nurs, 22 (1-2). pp. 201-210, which has been published in final form at http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2702.2012.04140.x This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.
Uncontrolled Keywords : Adolescent, Child, Consultants, Great Britain, Health Services Research, Humans, Nurse's Role, Pediatric Nursing
Related URLs :
Additional Information : Full text not available from this repository.
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 07 Jun 2016 13:27
Last Modified : 07 Jun 2016 13:27
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/810947

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