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Urban Cultivation and Its Contributions to Sustainability: Nibbles of Food but Oodles of Social Capital

Martin, G, Clift, R and Christie, IP (2016) Urban Cultivation and Its Contributions to Sustainability: Nibbles of Food but Oodles of Social Capital Sustainability, 8 (5). p. 409.

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Abstract

The contemporary interest in urban cultivation in the global North as a component of sustainable food production warrants assessment of both its quantitative and qualitative roles. This exploratory study weighs the nutritional, ecological, and social sustainability contributions of urban agriculture by examining three cases—a community garden in the core of New York, a community farm on the edge of London, and an agricultural park on the periphery of San Francisco. Our field analysis of these sites, confirmed by generic estimates, shows very low food outputs relative to the populations of their catchment areas; the great share of urban food will continue to come from multiple foodsheds beyond urban peripheries, often far beyond. Cultivation is a more appropriate designation than agriculture for urban food growing because its sustainability benefits are more social than agronomic or ecological. A major potential benefit lies in enhancing the ecological knowledge of urbanites, including an appreciation of the role that organic food may play in promoting both sustainability and health. This study illustrates how benefits differ according to local conditions, including population density and demographics, operational scale, soil quality, and access to labor and consumers. Recognizing the real benefits, including the promotion of sustainable diets, could enable urban food growing to be developed as a component of regional foodsheds to improve the sustainability and resilience of food supply, and to further the process of public co-production of new forms of urban conviviality and wellbeing.

Item Type: Article
Subjects : Centre for Environmental Strategy
Divisions : Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences > Centre for Environmental Strategy
Authors :
AuthorsEmailORCID
Martin, GUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Clift, RUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Christie, IPUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : 25 April 2016
Identification Number : 10.3390/su8050409
Copyright Disclaimer : © 2016 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
Uncontrolled Keywords : catchment area; core/edge/periphery urban areas; environmental education; environmental justice; food/ecological/social sustainability; food hub; foodshed; food system
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 26 May 2016 13:28
Last Modified : 26 May 2016 13:28
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/810853

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