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An Old Model of Social Class? Job Characteristics and the NS-SEC Schema

Williams, MT (2016) An Old Model of Social Class? Job Characteristics and the NS-SEC Schema Work, Employment and Society.

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Abstract

This article explores the relationship between the job characteristics underlying the Goldthorpe model of social class (work monitoring difficulty and human asset specificity) and those underlying theories of technological change (routine and analytical tasks) highlighted as key drivers for growing inequality. Analysis of the 2012 British Skills and Employment Survey demonstrate monitoring difficulty and asset specificity predict National Statistics Socio-Economic Classification (NS-SEC) membership and employment relations in ways expected by the Goldthorpe model, but the role of asset specificity is partially confounded by analytical tasks. It concludes that while the Goldthorpe model continues to provide a useful descriptive tool of inequality-producing processes and employment relations in the labour market, examining underlying job characteristics directly is a promising avenue for future research in explaining dynamics in the evolution of occupational inequalities over time.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences > Surrey Business School
Authors :
AuthorsEmailORCID
Williams, MTUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : 2016
Copyright Disclaimer : 2016 Copyright Sage Publications
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 11 May 2016 11:09
Last Modified : 11 May 2016 11:09
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/810641

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