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It's complicated – Factors predicting decisional conflict in prenatal diagnostic testing

Muller, C and Cameron, LD (2015) It's complicated – Factors predicting decisional conflict in prenatal diagnostic testing Health Expectations, 19 (2). pp. 388-402.

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Abstract

Background The technologies currently available to detect the presence of foetal genetic abnormalities are complex, and undergoing prenatal diagnostic testing can have wide-ranging repercussions. Before individuals can decide with certainty whether or not to take these tests, they first need to grasp the many psychosocial and clinical dimensions of prenatal genetic testing. Objective To test a model integrating key psychosocial and clinical factors as predictors of decisional conflict in decisions about whether or not to undergo prenatal genetic testing. Method Adults (n = 457) read one of four hypothetical scenarios asking them to imagine expecting a child and considering the option of a prenatal test able to detect a genetic condition; age of condition onset (birth vs. adulthood) and its curability (no cure vs. curable) were manipulated. Participants completed measures of decisional conflict, perceived benefits from normal results, test response efficacy, condition coherence, child-related worry, perceived disagreement with the other parent’s preference, motivation to comply with doctors’ perceived preferences, and parity. Results Prenatal testing decisional conflict was positively predicted by perceiving normal results as beneficial, doubting the test’s reliability, lacking understanding of the genetic condition, worrying about the health of the foetus, perceiving differences of opinion from partner/spouse, wanting to follow doctors’ preferences, and being childless. Discussion These results, of growing relevance given the increasing availability of new technologies in pregnancy care, can inform communication strategies that facilitate couples’ decision making. Conclusion This study provides insights into factors that might complicate prenatal testing decision making.

Item Type: Article
Subjects : subj_Psychology
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Psychology
Authors :
AuthorsEmailORCID
Muller, CUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Cameron, LDUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : 13 April 2015
Identification Number : 10.1111/hex.12363
Copyright Disclaimer : This is the peer reviewed version of the following article:It's complicated – Factors predicting decisional conflict in prenatal diagnostic testing, which has been published in final form at http://doi.org/10.1111/hex.12363. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 04 May 2016 08:35
Last Modified : 04 May 2016 08:35
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/810613

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