University of Surrey

Test tubes in the lab Research in the ATI Dance Research

Personality and Occupational Specialty: An Examination of Medical Specialties using Holland’s RIASEC Model

Woods, SA, Patterson, F, Koczwara, A and Wille, B (2016) Personality and Occupational Specialty: An Examination of Medical Specialties using Holland’s RIASEC Model Career Development International.

[img] Text
Woods_Patterson_Koczwara_Wille_CDI_Personality_Occupational_Specialty (2).pdf - Accepted version Manuscript
Restricted to Repository staff only
Available under License : See the attached licence file.

Download (387kB)
[img]
Preview
Text (licence)
SRI_deposit_agreement.pdf
Available under License : See the attached licence file.

Download (33kB) | Preview

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to re-examine the role of personality in occupational specialty choice, to better understand how and in what ways personality traits might influence vocational development after a person has chosen a career. Design/Methodology/Approach: The study tested hypotheses in a sample of UK medical students, each of whom had chosen their specialty pathway, and completed a measure of the Big Five personality traits. Associations of the junior doctor’s Big Five personality traits with the Holland RIASEC (Realistic, Investigative, Artistic, Social, Enterprising, Conventional) profiles of their medical specialty selections (derived from the O*NET database) were examined. Findings: Findings provided good support for our hypotheses. Junior doctors’ Agreeableness (with Social) and Neuroticism (with Realistic, Artistic, and Enterprising) were the main predictors of the RIASEC profiles of their specialty selections. Research Implications: The findings suggest that personality traits influence specialty selection in predictable ways, and differently compared to occupational choice. The paper discusses findings within a theoretical framework that explains how and why trait influences on within-occupational specialty selection differ from influences on occupational interest and choice more broadly. The potential mechanisms underlying these associations are explored in the context of motivational aspects of Agreeableness and Neuroticism. Practical Implications: Within-occupation specialties should feature in career guidance discussions and interventions more explicitly to enable people to decide whether occupational specialties are available that appeal to their individual differences. Originality/Value: This is the first study to examine the relations of personality and occupational specialty through the lens of the RIASEC model, and the first to propose cross-occupation theoretical pathways from personality to specialty choice. The data from the field of medicine enable us to test our propositions in a suitably diverse set of occupational specialties.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences > Surrey Business School
Authors :
AuthorsEmailORCID
Woods, SAUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Patterson, FUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Koczwara, AUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Wille, BUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : 2016
Identification Number : 10.1108/CDI-10-2015-0130
Copyright Disclaimer : ©Emerald Group Publishing Limited.
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 29 Apr 2016 10:17
Last Modified : 29 Apr 2016 10:17
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/810590

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year


Information about this web site

© The University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH, United Kingdom.
+44 (0)1483 300800