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The effectiveness of the Mitchell Method Relaxation Technique for the treatment of fibromyalgia symptoms: a randomised controlled trial

Amirova, A, Cropley, M and Theadom, A (2016) The effectiveness of the Mitchell Method Relaxation Technique for the treatment of fibromyalgia symptoms: a randomised controlled trial International Journal of Stress Management.

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Abstract

Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of the Mitchell Method Relaxation Technique (MMRT) in reducing symptoms of fibromyalgia. Design: A randomised controlled trial was used to compare the effectiveness of self-administered MMRT (n= 67) with attention control (n = 66) and usual care (n = 56) groups. Main Outcome Measures: Primary outcomes included self-reported fatigue, pain, and sleep. Secondary outcomes were daily functioning, quality of life, depression, and coping, anxiety and perceived stress. Outcomes were assessed at baseline, post-intervention (four weeks) and follow-up (eight weeks). Results: A significant combined improvement on outcomes (p<.005), specific significant effects for sleep problems (d=0.29, p<.05), sleep inadequacy (d=0.20, p<.05), and fatigue (d=0.47, p<.05) were present in the MMRT group. At the follow-up, fatigue did not differ to the post-intervention score (p=.25) indicating short-term sustainability of the effect. The effects on sleep problems and sleep inadequacy were not sustained. The pain levels decreased when the MMRT was practiced three times a week (p<.001). Conclusion: MMRT was effective in reducing pain, sleep problems, and fatigue. High rates of relative risk reduction for fatigue (37%) and pain (42.8%) suggest clinical significance.

Item Type: Article
Subjects : subj_Psychology
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Psychology
Authors :
AuthorsEmailORCID
Amirova, AUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Cropley, MUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Theadom, AUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : 2016
Copyright Disclaimer : © 2016 American Psychological Association. This is the accepted version of an article awaiting publication. This article may not exactly replicate the final version published in the APA journal. It is not the copy of record.
Related URLs :
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 22 Apr 2016 14:33
Last Modified : 22 Apr 2016 14:33
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/810518

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