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The relationship between burnout and risk-taking in workplace decision-making and decision-making style

Michailidis, E and Banks, AP (2016) The relationship between burnout and risk-taking in workplace decision-making and decision-making style Work and Stress, 30 (3). pp. 278-292.

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Abstract

The study aimed to investigate what type of decision styles are exhibited by employees who experience burnout. Using a Work Risk Inventory (WRI), developed for this study, which included generic workplace scenarios, it was also explored whether employees experiencing burnout take more risky decisions. Risk was conceptualised as the adoption of threatening decisions towards one’s reputation at work, job performance and job security. The mediating effect of the likelihood and seriousness of the consequences of the worst-case scenario occurring (i.e. what could be the worst that could happen in each given scenario), on the relationship between dimensions of burnout and risk was also tested. A total of 262 employees completed an online survey, including measures on burnout, decision making styles and the WRI. As predicted, dimensions of burnout: Exhaustion; Cynicism and Professional Inefficacy, correlated significantly with avoidant decision making and negatively with rational decision making. Seriousness of the consequences of the worst-case scenario occurring mediated the relationship between professional inefficacy and risk taking. In the context of identifying mechanisms by which burnout leads to risky decision making, findings suggest that employees’ sense of professional inefficacy determines employees’ risky decision making. The contribution to theory and implications for practice are discussed.

Item Type: Article
Subjects : subj_Psychology
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Psychology
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Michailidis, E
Banks, AP
Date : 3 August 2016
Identification Number : 10.1080/02678373.2016.1213773
Copyright Disclaimer : This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Work and Stress on 3 August 2016, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/[10.1080/02678373.2016.1213773].”
Related URLs :
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 20 Apr 2016 11:09
Last Modified : 17 Jan 2018 13:11
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/810478

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