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Conceptualizing leadership perceptions as attitudes: Using attitude theory to further understand the leadership process

Lee, A, Martin, R, Thomas, G, Guillaume, Y and Maio, GR (2015) Conceptualizing leadership perceptions as attitudes: Using attitude theory to further understand the leadership process LEADERSHIP QUARTERLY, 26 (6). pp. 910-934.

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Abstract

Leadership is one of the most examined factors in relation to understanding employee well-being and performance. While there are disparate approaches to studying leadership, they share a common assumption that perceptions of a leader's behavior determine reactions to the leader. The concept of leadership perception is poorly understood in most theoretical approaches. To address this, we propose that there are many benefits from examining leadership perceptions as an attitude towards the leader. In this review, we show how research examining a number of aspects of attitudes (content, structure and function) can advance understanding of leadership perceptions and how these affect work-related outcomes. Such a perspective provides a more multi-faceted understanding of leadership perceptions than previously envisaged and this can provide a more detailed understanding of how such perceptions affect outcomes. In addition, we examine some of the main theoretical and methodological implications of viewing leadership perceptions as attitudes to the wider leadership area. The cross-fertilization of research from the attitudes literature to understanding leadership perceptions provides new insights into leadership processes and potential avenues for further research.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences > Surrey Business School
Authors :
AuthorsEmailORCID
Lee, AUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Martin, RUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Thomas, GUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Guillaume, YUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Maio, GRUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : 6 November 2015
Identification Number : 10.1016/j.leaqua.2015.10.003
Copyright Disclaimer : © 2015. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
Uncontrolled Keywords : Social Sciences, Psychology, Applied, Management, Psychology, Business & Economics, Leadership, Leadership perceptions, Attitudes, Performance, Attitude strength, IMPLICIT ASSOCIATION TEST, PERCEIVED ORGANIZATIONAL SUPPORT, MEMBER EXCHANGE, TRANSACTIONAL LEADERSHIP, PLANNED BEHAVIOR, JOB-SATISFACTION, TRANSFORMATIONAL LEADERSHIP, INDIVIDUAL-DIFFERENCES, SELECTIVE EXPOSURE, SOCIAL IDENTITY
Related URLs :
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 11 Apr 2016 14:16
Last Modified : 11 Apr 2016 14:16
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/810398

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