University of Surrey

Test tubes in the lab Research in the ATI Dance Research

Assessment strategies for teaching empathy, intuition and sensitivity on the labour ward

Brown, A (2015) Assessment strategies for teaching empathy, intuition and sensitivity on the labour ward Evidence Based Midwifery, 10 (2). pp. 64-70.

[img] Text
Assessment strategy - post doc paper Evidenced based Midwifery 2012.pdf - Accepted version Manuscript
Restricted to Repository staff only
Available under License : See the attached licence file.

Download (549kB)
[img] PDF (licence)
SRI_deposit_agreement.pdf
Restricted to Repository staff only
Available under License : See the attached licence file.

Download (33kB)

Abstract

Aim: This research sought to explore how the skills of non-verbal communication are taught, learnt and assessed on a labour ward. Method: An ethnographic approach was used to explore the relationship between mentors and students in a labour ward setting during focus group discussions across a number of trusts. The object was to ascertain, through discussion, how students learn and mentors assess the skills of empathy, intuition and sensitivity in being “with woman” in a labour ward setting. An etic view of relationships between mentor and student in a labour ward culture was explored through the facilitation of focus group discussion. Ethical approval was obtained from Integrated Research Application System and the University of Surrey Ethics Committee. Sample: A total of fifty-six participants across eight sites took part in the project including mentors and third year students on midwifery programmes. Findings: Three main themes from the data analysis were identified: being “with woman”, teaching and learning strategies, and assessment. Implications: The findings implied that most participants agreed on a definition of being “with woman” and used role modelling to teach and learn these skills. Mentors, however, implied that assessing such skills was difficult and concluded that continuous assessment of communication skills and the “soft skills” of empathy, sensitivity and intuition were required.

Item Type: Article
Authors :
AuthorsEmailORCID
Brown, AUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : 1 June 2015
Funders : Iolanthe Trust & Dame Rosalind Page Awards
Grant Title : £1500
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 28 Mar 2017 10:58
Last Modified : 28 Mar 2017 10:58
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/810028

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year


Information about this web site

© The University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH, United Kingdom.
+44 (0)1483 300800