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Fast Assembly of Gold Nanoparticles in Large-Area 2-D Nanogrids Using a One-Step, Near-Infrared Radiation-Assisted Evaporation Process

Keddie, JL, Sear, RP, Jeynes, C, Florescu, M, Maspero, R and Utgenannt, A (2016) Fast Assembly of Gold Nanoparticles in Large-Area 2-D Nanogrids Using a One-Step, Near-Infrared Radiation-Assisted Evaporation Process ACS Nano, 10 (2). pp. 2232-2242.

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Abstract

When fabricating photonic crystals from suspensions in volatile liquids using the horizontal deposition method, the conventional approach is to evaporate slowly to increase the time for particles to settle in an ordered, periodic close-packed structure. Here, we show that the greatest ordering of 10 nm aqueous gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) in a template of larger spherical polymer particles (mean diameter of 338 nm) is achieved with very fast water evaporation rates obtained with near-infrared radiative heating. Fabrication of arrays over areas of a few cm2 takes only seven minutes. The assembly process requires that the evaporation rate is fast relative to the particles’ Brownian diffusion. Then a two-dimensional colloidal crystal forms at the falling surface, which acts as a sieve through which the AuNPs pass, according to our Langevin dynamics computer simulations. With sufficiently fast evaporation rates, we create a hybrid structure consisting of a two-dimensional AuNP nanoarray (or “nanogrid”) on top of a three-dimensional polymer opal. The process is simple, fast and one-step. The interplay between the optical response of the plasmonic Au nanoarray and the microstructuring of the photonic opal results in unusual optical spectra with two extinction peaks, which are analyzed via finite-difference time-domain method simulations. Comparison between experimental and modelling results reveals a strong interplay of plasmonic modes and collective photonic effects, including the formation of a high-order stop band and slow-light enhanced plasmonic absorption. The structures, and hence their optical signatures, are tuned by adjusting the evaporation rate via the infrared power density.

Item Type: Article
Subjects : Physics
Divisions : Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences > Physics
Authors :
AuthorsEmailORCID
Keddie, JLUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Sear, RPUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Jeynes, CUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Florescu, MUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Maspero, RUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Utgenannt, AUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : 15 January 2016
Identification Number : 10.1021/acsnano.5b06886
Additional Information : Copyright © 2016 American Chemical Society. ACS AuthorChoice - This is an open access article published under a Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the author and source are cited.
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 18 Mar 2016 17:00
Last Modified : 18 Mar 2016 17:00
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/809780

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