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Cancer immunotherapy via combining oncolytic virotherapy with chemotherapy: recent advances

Relph, KL, Pandha, H, Simpson, GR, Melcher, A and Harrington, K (2016) Cancer immunotherapy via combining oncolytic virotherapy with chemotherapy: recent advances Oncolytic Virotherapy, 2016 (5). pp. 1-13.

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Abstract

Oncolytic viruses are multifunctional anticancer agents with huge clinical potential, and have recently passed the randomized Phase III clinical trial hurdle. Both wild-type and engineered viruses have been selected for targeting of specific cancers, to elicit cytotoxicity, and also to generate antitumor immunity. Single-agent oncolytic virotherapy treatments have resulted in modest effects in the clinic. There is increasing interest in their combination with cytotoxic agents, radiotherapy and immune-checkpoint inhibitors. Similarly to oncolytic viruses, the benefits of chemotherapeutic agents may be that they induce systemic antitumor immunity through the induction of immunogenic cell death of cancer cells. Combining these two treatment modalities has to date resulted in significant potential in vitro and in vivo synergies through various mechanisms without any apparent additional toxicities. Chemotherapy has been and will continue to be integral to the management of advanced cancers. This review therefore focuses on the potential for a number of common cytotoxic agents to be combined with clinically relevant oncolytic viruses. In many cases, this combined approach has already advanced to the clinical trial arena.

Item Type: Article
Subjects : Medical Science
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Biosciences and Medicine
Authors :
AuthorsEmailORCID
Relph, KLUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Pandha, HUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Simpson, GRUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Melcher, AUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Harrington, KUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : 6 January 2016
Identification Number : 10.2147/OV.S66083
Copyright Disclaimer : © 2016 Simpson et al. This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited. The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution – Non Commercial (unported, v4.0) License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/). By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed. For permission for commercial use of this work, please see paragraphs 4.2 and 5 of our Terms (https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php).
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 13 Jan 2016 12:45
Last Modified : 13 Sep 2016 08:35
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/809744

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