University of Surrey

Test tubes in the lab Research in the ATI Dance Research

Reds are more important than greens: how UK supermarket shoppers use the different information on a traffic light nutrition label in a choice experiment

Scarborough, P, Matthews, A, Eyles, H, Kaur, A, Hodgkins, Charo, Raats, Monique and Rayner, M (2015) Reds are more important than greens: how UK supermarket shoppers use the different information on a traffic light nutrition label in a choice experiment International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 12, ARTN 1.

[img]
Preview
Text
Reds are more important than greens: how UK supermarket shoppers use the different information on a traffic light nutrition label in a choice experiment..pdf - ["content_typename_Accepted version (post-print)" not defined]
Available under License : See the attached licence file.

Download (703kB) | Preview
[img]
Preview
Text (licence)
SRI_deposit_agreement.pdf
Available under License : See the attached licence file.

Download (33kB) | Preview

Abstract

Background: Colour coded front-of-pack nutrition labelling (‘traffic light labelling’) has been recommended for use in the UK since 2006. The voluntary scheme is used by all the major retailers and some manufacturers. It is not clear how consumers use these labels to make a single decision about the relative healthiness of foods. Our research questions were: Which of the four nutrients on UK traffic light labels (total fat, saturated fat, sugar and salt) has the most influence on decisions? Do green lights or red lights have a greater influence? Are there age and gender differences in how people use the colour and nutrient information?

Methods: We recruited participants from a UK supermarket chain membership list to conduct an online choice experiment in May 2014. We analysed data using multilevel logisitic models with food choices (n = 3321) nested in individuals (n = 187) as the unit of analysis.

Results: A food with more reds was 11.4 (95 % confidence intervals: 10.3, 12.5) times less likely to be chosen as healthy, whereas a food with more greens was 6.1 (5.6, 6.6) times more likely to be chosen as healthy. Foods with better colours on saturated fat and salt were 7.3 (6.7, 8.0) and 7.1 (6.5, 7.8) times more likely to be chosen as healthy – significantly greater than for total fat (odds ratio 4.8 (4.4, 5.3)) and sugar (5.2 (4.7, 5.6)). Results were broadly similar for different genders and age groups.

Conclusions: We found that participants were more concerned with avoiding reds than choosing greens, and that saturated fat and salt had a greater influence on decisions regarding healthiness than total fat and sugar. This could influence decisions about food reformulation and guidance on using nutrition labelling.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Psychology
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Scarborough, PUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Matthews, AUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Eyles, HUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Kaur, AUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Hodgkins, CharoC.Hodgkins@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Raats, MoniqueM.Raats@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Rayner, MUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : 12 December 2015
Identification Number : 10.1186/s12966-015-0319-9
Copyright Disclaimer : © 2015 Scarborough et al. Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
Uncontrolled Keywords : Traffic light; Nutrition label; Food label; Front of pack nutrition labelling; Colour coded nutrition labelling
Related URLs :
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 08 Jan 2016 11:28
Last Modified : 31 Oct 2017 17:59
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/809701

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year


Information about this web site

© The University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH, United Kingdom.
+44 (0)1483 300800