University of Surrey

Test tubes in the lab Research in the ATI Dance Research

Supporting self-management after attending a structured education programme: A qualitative longitudinal investigation of type 1 diabetes patients experiences and views

Rankin, D, Lawton, J, Cooke, DD, Elliott, J and Heller, SR (2012) Supporting self-management after attending a structured education programme: A qualitative longitudinal investigation of type 1 diabetes patients experiences and views BMC Public Health, 12 (1).

[img]
Preview
Text
Supporting self-management after attending a structured education programme: a qualitative longitudinal investigation of type 1 diabetes patients' experiences and views..pdf - ["content_typename_Accepted version (post-print)" not defined]
Available under License : See the attached licence file.

Download (219kB) | Preview
[img]
Preview
PDF (licence)
SRI_deposit_agreement.pdf
Available under License : See the attached licence file.

Download (33kB) | Preview

Abstract

Background: Structured education programmes for patients with diabetes and other chronic conditions are being widely adopted. However, follow-up studies suggest that course graduates may struggle to sustain the self-care practices taught on their courses over time. This study explored the support needs of patients with type 1 diabetes after attending a structured education programme promoting an empowerment approach and training in use of flexible intensive insulin therapy, a regimen now widely advocated and used to manage this condition. The objective was to inform future support offered to course graduates. Methods. Repeat, in-depth interviews with 30 type 1 diabetes patients after attending Dose Adjustment for Normal Eating (DAFNE) courses in the UK, and six and 12months later. Data were analysed using an inductive, thematic approach. Results: While the flexible intensive insulin treatment approach taught on DAFNE courses was seen as a logical and effective way of managing ones diabetes, it was also considered more technically complex than other insulin regimens. To sustain effective disease self-management using flexible intensive insulin treatment over time, patients often expected, and needed, on-going input and support from health care professionals trained in the approach. This included: help determining insulin dose adjustments; reassurance; and, opportunities to trouble-shoot issues of concern. While some benefits were identified to receiving follow-up support in a group setting, most patients stated a preference or need for tailored and individualised support from appropriately-trained clinicians, accessible on an as and when needed basis. Conclusions: Our findings highlight potential limitations to group-based forms of follow-up support for sustaining diabetes self-management. To maintain the clinical benefits of structured education for patients with type 1 diabetes over time, course graduates may benefit from and prefer ongoing, one-to-one support from health care professionals trained in the programmes practices and principles. This support should be tailored and personalised to reflect patients specific and unique experiences of applying their education and training in the context of their everyday lives, and could be the subject of future research. © 2012 Rankin et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences
Authors :
AuthorsEmailORCID
Rankin, DUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Lawton, JUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Cooke, DDUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Elliott, JUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Heller, SRUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : 14 August 2012
Identification Number : 10.1186/1471-2458-12-652
Additional Information : This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://​creativecommons.​org/​licenses/​by/​2.​0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 19 Jan 2016 15:32
Last Modified : 19 Jan 2016 15:32
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/809584

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year


Information about this web site

© The University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH, United Kingdom.
+44 (0)1483 300800