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The role of materials selection in the urban heat island effect in dry mid-latitude climates

Kakoniti, A, Georgiou, G, Marakkos, K, Marakkos, K, Kumar, P, Kumar, P and Neophytou, MKA (2015) The role of materials selection in the urban heat island effect in dry mid-latitude climates Environmental Fluid Mechanics.

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Abstract

© 2015 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht This work investigates the role of materials selected for different urban surfaces (e.g. on building walls, roofs and pavements) in the intensity of the urban heat island (UHI) phenomenon. Three archetypal street-canyon geometries are considered, reflecting two-dimensional canyon arrays with frontal packing densities (λf) of 0.5, 0.25 and 0.125 under direct solar radiation and ground heating. The impact of radiative heat transfer in the urban environment is examined for each of the different built packing densities. A number of extreme heat scenarios were modelled in order to mimic conditions often found at low- to mid-latitudes dry climates. The investigation involved a suite of different computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations using the Reynolds-Averaged Navier–Stokes equations for mass and momentum coupled with the energy equation as well as using the standard k-ε turbulence model. Results indicate that a higher rate of ventilation within the street canyon is observed in areas with sparser built packing density. However, such higher ventilation rates were not necessarily found to be linked with lower temperatures within the canyon; this is because such sparser geometries are associated with higher heat transfer from the wider surfaces of road material under the condition of direct solar radiation and ground heating. Sparser canyon arrays corresponding to wider asphalt street roads in particular, have been found to yield substantially higher air temperatures. Additional simulations indicated that replacing asphalt road surfaces in streets with concrete roads (of different albedo or emissivity characteristics) can lead up to a ~5 °C reduction in the canyon air temperature in dry climates. It is finally concluded that an optimized selection of materials in the urban infrastructure design can lead to a more effective mitigation of the UHI phenomenon than the optimisation of the built packing density.

Item Type: Article
Authors :
AuthorsEmailORCID
Kakoniti, AUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Georgiou, GUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Marakkos, KUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Marakkos, KUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Kumar, PUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Kumar, PUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Neophytou, MKAUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : 4 September 2015
Identification Number : https://doi.org/10.1007/s10652-015-9426-z
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 28 Mar 2017 10:57
Last Modified : 28 Mar 2017 10:57
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/809512

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