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Indoor air quality and energy management through real-time sensing in commercial buildings

Kumar, P, Martani, C, Morawska, L, Norford, L, Choudhary, R, Bell, M and Leach, M (2016) Indoor air quality and energy management through real-time sensing in commercial buildings Energy and Buildings, 111. pp. 145-153.

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Abstract

Rapid growth in the global population requires expansion of building stock, which in turn calls for increased energy demand. This demand varies in time and also between different buildings, yet, conventional methods are only able to provide mean energy levels per zone and are unable to capture this inhomogeneity, which is important to conserve energy. An additional challenge is that some of the attempts to conserve energy, through for example lowering of ventilation rates, have been shown to exacerbate another problem, which is unacceptable indoor air quality (IAQ). The rise of sensing technology over the past decade has shown potential to address both these issues simultaneously by providing high–resolution tempo–spatial data to systematically analyse the energy demand and its consumption as well as the impacts of measures taken to control energy consumption on IAQ. However, challenges remain in the development of affordable services for data analysis, deployment of large–scale real–time sensing network and responding through Building Energy Management Systems. This article presents the fundamental drivers behind the rise of sensing technology for the management of energy and IAQ in urban built environments, highlights major challenges for their large–scale deployment and identifies the research gaps that should be closed by future investigations.

Item Type: Article
Authors :
AuthorsEmailORCID
Kumar, PUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Martani, CUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Morawska, LUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Norford, LUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Choudhary, RUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Bell, MUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Leach, MUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : 1 January 2016
Identification Number : 10.1016/j.enbuild.2015.11.037
Additional Information : © 2016. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 15 Dec 2015 16:09
Last Modified : 15 Dec 2015 16:09
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/809511

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