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Breaking significant news: The experience of clinical nurse specialists in cancer and palliative care

Mischelmovich, N, Arber, Anne and Odelius, A (2015) Breaking significant news: The experience of clinical nurse specialists in cancer and palliative care European Journal of Oncology Nursing (EJON).

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Abstract

Purpose: The aim of the research was to explore specialist cancer and palliative care nurses experience of delivering significant news to patients with advanced cancer. Method: A qualitative phenomenological research study was conducted to capture nurses' experiences with the aim of understanding how cancer and palliative care clinical nurse specialists work towards disclosure of advanced and terminal cancer.. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with 10 clinical nurse specialists working in one acute NHS trust. Clinical nurse specialists were recruited from the following specialties: lung cancer, breast cancer, gynaecological cancer, upper and lower gastrointestinal cancer and palliative care. Results: Four themes emerged from the data: importance of relationships; perspective taking; ways to break significant news; feeling prepared and putting yourself forward. The findings revealed that highly experienced clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) felt confident in their skills in delivering significant news and they report using patient centred communication to build a trusting relationship so significant news was easier to share with patients. CNSs were aware of guidelines and protocols for breaking significant and bad news but reported that they used guidelines flexibly and it was their years of clinical experience that enabled them to be effective in disclosing significant news. Some areas of disclosure were found to be challenging in particular news of a terminal prognosis to patients who were of a younger age. Conclusion: CNSs have become more directly involved in breaking significant news to those with advanced cancer by putting themselves forward and feeling confident in their skills.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences
Authors :
AuthorsEmailORCID
Mischelmovich, NUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Arber, Annea.arber@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Odelius, AUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : 1 November 2015
Identification Number : 10.1016/j.ejon.2015.09.006
Additional Information : © 2015. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 11 Nov 2015 12:11
Last Modified : 01 Nov 2016 02:08
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/809346

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