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Evaluation of local and national effects of recovering phosphorus at wastewater treatment plants: Lessons learned from the UK

Kleemann, R, Chenoweth, J, Clift, R, Morse, S, Pearce, P and Saroj, DP (2015) Evaluation of local and national effects of recovering phosphorus at wastewater treatment plants: Lessons learned from the UK Resources, Conservation and Recycling.

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Evaluation of P Recovery from WWTP Rosanna Kleemann MANUSCRIPT Minor Revisions v.2.3.pdf - Accepted version Manuscript
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Abstract

P recovery from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) as struvite fertiliser is a recognised method of improving P use efficiency and reducing P losses into the environment. The main driver for P recovery from the water industry viewpoint is the reduction in the nuisance of struvite clogging inside pumps and pipes. Struvite recovery leads to an average P recovery rate of 72 ± 7% from centrifuge centrate, with 8.8 ± 0.7% total P and 20.5 ± 3.2% PO4-P removed from the WWTP influent as struvite. This reduces the potential for struvite precipitation, moderates P loads on biological nutrient removal processes and lowers P concentration in the final effluent. Totalling revenue from sale of struvite and operational site savings, P recovery becomes an attractive option for water companies. The implementation of P recovery technologies to produce struvite fertiliser in all UK WWTPs could produce a national P fertiliser source of 7.05 ± 2.01 kt P/year. In addition, sludge produced at WWTPs could be diverted to advanced energy recovery (AER) processes and P recovered from AER residues; up to 21.71 ± 0.95 kt P/year could be recovered in this way in the UK. Combining the two methods of P recovery, UK imports of P fertiliser could be reduced by 36.2 ± 1.1%. P recovery on a large scale has the further benefit of protecting against eutrophication by reducing P emissions to water bodies by 21.7 ± 1.9%. The protection of the environment and reduction in reliance on imported P are major national motivations to legislate P recovery from waste.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences > Civil and Environmental Engineering
Authors :
AuthorsEmailORCID
Kleemann, RUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Chenoweth, JUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Clift, RUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Morse, SUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Pearce, PUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Saroj, DPUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : 17 October 2015
Identification Number : 10.1016/j.resconrec.2015.09.007
Additional Information : © 2015. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 11 Nov 2015 14:42
Last Modified : 17 Oct 2016 01:08
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/809090

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