University of Surrey

Test tubes in the lab Research in the ATI Dance Research

Involvement of the skin during bluetongue virus infection and replication in the ruminant host.

Darpel, KE, Monaghan, P, Simpson, J, Anthony, SJ, Veronesi, E, Brooks, HW, Elliott, H, Brownlie, J, Takamatsu, HH, Mellor, PS and Mertens, PP (2012) Involvement of the skin during bluetongue virus infection and replication in the ruminant host. VETERINARY RESEARCH, 43.

[img]
Preview
Text
Involvement of the skin during bluetongue virus infection and replication in the ruminant host..pdf - ["content_typename_Published version (Publisher's proof or final PDF)" not defined]
Available under License : See the attached licence file.

Download (6MB) | Preview
[img]
Preview
PDF (licence)
SRI_deposit_agreement.pdf
Available under License : See the attached licence file.

Download (33kB) | Preview

Abstract

Bluetongue virus (BTV) is a double stranded (ds) RNA virus (genus Orbivirus; family Reoviridae), which is considered capable of infecting all species of domestic and wild ruminants, although clinical signs are seen mostly in sheep. BTV is arthropod-borne ("arbovirus") and able to productively infect and replicate in many different cell types of both insects and mammalian hosts. Although the organ and cellular tropism of BTV in ruminants has been the subject of several studies, many aspects of its pathogenesis are still poorly understood, partly because of inherent problems in distinguishing between "virus replication" and "virus presence".BTV replication and organ tropism were studied in a wide range of infected sheep tissues, by immuno-fluorescence-labeling of non-structural or structural proteins (NS2 or VP7 and core proteins, respectively) using confocal microscopy to distinguish between virus presence and replication. These results are compared to gross and microscopic pathological findings in selected organs from infected sheep. Replication was demonstrated in two major cell types: vascular endothelial cells, and agranular leukocytes which morphologically resemble lymphocytes, monocytes/macrophages and/or dendritic cells. Two organs (the skin and tonsils) were shown to support relatively high levels of BTV replication, although they have not previously been proposed as important replication sites during BTV infection. The high level of BTV replication in the skin is thought to be of major significance for the pathogenesis and transmission of BTV (via biting insects) and a refinement of our current model of BTV pathogenesis is discussed.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Veterinary Medicine
Authors :
AuthorsEmailORCID
Darpel, KEUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Monaghan, PUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Simpson, JUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Anthony, SJUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Veronesi, EUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Brooks, HWUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Elliott, HUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Brownlie, JUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Takamatsu, HHUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Mellor, PSUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Mertens, PPUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : January 2012
Identification Number : 10.1186/1297-9716-43-40
Uncontrolled Keywords : Animals, Bluetongue, Bluetongue virus, Ceratopogonidae, Feeding Behavior, Food Chain, Immunohistochemistry, Inflammation, Microscopy, Confocal, Organ Specificity, Sheep, Skin, Viral Core Proteins, Viral Nonstructural Proteins
Related URLs :
Additional Information : © 2012 Darpel et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 18 Nov 2015 18:27
Last Modified : 18 Nov 2015 18:27
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/809070

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year


Information about this web site

© The University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH, United Kingdom.
+44 (0)1483 300800