University of Surrey

Test tubes in the lab Research in the ATI Dance Research

Guiding healthier food choice: systematic comparison of four front-of-pack labelling systems and their effect on judgements of product healthiness

Hodgkins, CE, Raats, MM, Fife-Schaw, C, Peacock, M, Groeppel-Klein, A, Koenigstorfer, J, Wasowicz, G, Stysko-Kunkowska, M, Gulcan, Y, Kustepeli, Y, Gibbs, M, Shepherd, R and Grunert, KG (2015) Guiding healthier food choice: systematic comparison of four front-of-pack labelling systems and their effect on judgements of product healthiness CAMBRIDGE UNIV PRESS.

[img] Text
BJN manuscript_for symplectic(final).doc
Restricted to Repository staff only
Available under License : See the attached licence file.

Download (943kB)
[img]
Preview
Text (licence)
SRI_deposit_agreement.pdf
Available under License : See the attached licence file.

Download (33kB) | Preview
[img]
Preview
Text
BJN Guiding healthier food choice.pdf

Download (1MB) | Preview

Abstract

Different front-of-pack (FOP) labelling systems have been developed in Europe by industry and organisations concerned with health promotion. A study (n 2068) was performed to establish the extent to which inclusion of the most prevalent FOP systems--guideline daily amounts (GDA), traffic lights (TL), GDA+TL hybrid (HYB) and health logos (HL)--impact consumer perceptions of healthiness over and above the provision of a FOP basic label (BL) containing numerical nutritional information alone. The design included within- and between-subjects factors. The within-subjects factors were: food (pizzas, yogurts and biscuits), healthiness of the food (high health, medium health and low health) and the repeated measurements under BL and test FOP label conditions. The between-subjects factors were: the system (GDA, TL, GDA+TL hybrid, HL), portion size (typical portion size and a 50% reduction of a typical portion) and country (the UK, Germany, Poland and Turkey). Although the FOP systems tested did result in small improvements for objective understanding under some conditions, there was little difference between the provision of an FOP label containing basic numerical nutritional information alone or between the various systems. Thus, any structured and legible presentation of key nutrient and energy information on the FOP label is sufficient to enable consumers to detect a healthier alternative within a food category when provided with foods that have distinctly different levels of healthiness. Future research should focus on developing greater understanding of the psychological and contextual factors that impact motivation and the opportunity to use the various FOP systems in real-world shopping settings.

Item Type: Other
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Psychology
Authors :
AuthorsEmailORCID
Hodgkins, CEUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Raats, MMUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Fife-Schaw, CUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Peacock, MUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Groeppel-Klein, AUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Koenigstorfer, JUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Wasowicz, GUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Stysko-Kunkowska, MUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Gulcan, YUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Kustepeli, YUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Gibbs, MUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Shepherd, RUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Grunert, KGUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : 28 May 2015
Identification Number : 10.1017/S0007114515000264
Uncontrolled Keywords : Science & Technology, Life Sciences & Biomedicine, Nutrition & Dietetics, Front-of-pack, Nutrition labelling, Healthier choices, Health inferences, Healthiness
Related URLs :
Additional Information : Copyright © 2015 Cambridge University Press
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 03 Nov 2015 15:53
Last Modified : 03 Nov 2015 15:53
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/808788

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year


Information about this web site

© The University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH, United Kingdom.
+44 (0)1483 300800