University of Surrey

Test tubes in the lab Research in the ATI Dance Research

Optimising sustainability, performance and public health protection in the design and operational life cycle of sports and leisure pool complexes.

Lewis, Lowell J. (2015) Optimising sustainability, performance and public health protection in the design and operational life cycle of sports and leisure pool complexes. Doctoral thesis, University of Surrey.

[img]
Preview
Text (Volume 1)
L Lewis EngD Thesis - Volume 1 (July 2015).pdf - Thesis (version of record)
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial Share Alike.

Download (12MB) | Preview
[img]
Preview
Archive (Volume 2)
Volume 2 (Print Draft 25-02-2015).pdf - Appendix
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial Share Alike.

Download (16MB) | Preview
[img] Archive (Volume 3)
Volume 3.zip - Appendix
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial Share Alike.

Download (2GB)
[img]
Preview
Text
Author_Deposit_Agreement.pdf - Other
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial Share Alike.

Download (165kB) | Preview

Abstract

This thesis presents a new framework that enables a better integrated and industry-wide approach to the sustainable design and operation of swimming pools in the UK. The framework addresses current issues in the swimming industry by proposing a restructuring of the regulatory and guidance structure to make use of existing pieces of UK legislation. A combination of a new approved code of practice for swimming pools incorporating risk-based assessments and changes to existing approved documents for building efficiency is proposed as an effective method of engaging all stakeholders. The industrial setting of the research enabled a practical evaluation of the current UK guidance and regulation. The need for additional performance indicators to improve the management of compliance with recommendations is identified. The Water Exchange Deficit is proposed as a new performance indicator to support the water management of a facility. In addition, the relationship between activity type and the impact on water quality is examined and discussed. An enhanced methodology for the prediction of the water demand of a facility has also been generated. This methodology incorporates newly published findings in relation to the nature of bather contamination and operational variables relating to evaporation rates and chemical dosing. In addition to the contributions above, the modelling of pool hydraulics was also undertaken to assess operational consequences of the existing implementation of industry guidance. A fundamental conflict was identified between the two key recommendations that should be adopted in relation to the design of pool hydraulics. Computational fluid dynamics and small-scale physical modelling approaches were used to show that the use of well-mixed hydraulics is effective at distributing chemicals but can also potentially increase the risk of exposure to disinfectant-resistant pathogens. The availability of new treatment technologies may present the opportunity for wholesale changes to the overall strategy of pool water treatment.

Item Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Divisions : Theses
Authors :
AuthorsEmailORCID
Lewis, Lowell J.lowelljlewis@hotmail.comUNSPECIFIED
Date : 30 October 2015
Funders : Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council, Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, Surrey Sports Park LTD
Contributors :
ContributionNameEmailORCID
Thesis supervisorPond, K.UNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Thesis supervisorChew, J.UNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Thesis supervisorColbourne, J.UNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Thesis supervisorWoodley, I.UNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Depositing User : Lowell Lewis
Date Deposited : 09 Nov 2015 09:07
Last Modified : 09 Nov 2015 09:07
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/808719

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year


Information about this web site

© The University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH, United Kingdom.
+44 (0)1483 300800