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How the co-benefits of addressing climate change can motivate action across the world

Bain, PG, Milfont, TL, Kashima, Y, Bilewicz, M, Doron, G, Garðarsdóttir, RB, Gouveia, VV, Guan, Y, Johansson, L, Pasquali, C, Verdugo, V, Aragones, JI, Utsugi, A, Demarque, C, Otto, S, Park, J, Soland, M, Steg, L, González, R, Lebedeva, N, Madsen, OJ, Wagner, C, Akotia, CS, Kurz, T, Saiz, JL, Schultz, PW, Einarsdóttir, G and Saviolidis, NM (2015) How the co-benefits of addressing climate change can motivate action across the world Nature Climate Change.

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Abstract

It is traditionally thought that the public must be convinced of the reality and importance of anthropogenic climate change in order to take personal and political action. However, convincing the broad public involves overcoming powerful ideological obstacles1-4, and in many places climate change is slipping in public importance5,6. Here we examined whether beliefs about the “co-benefits” of mitigating climate change7 can avoid these obstacles by motivating behavior in both those who accept climate change and those who are unconvinced or unconcerned. We describe an integrative framework for assessing co-benefits8, distinguishing sociological dimensions (e.g., pollution, disease, economic development), and community character (e.g., benevolence, competence). Data from all inhabited continents (24 countries; N=6059), showed that two types of co-benefits, Development (economic and scientific advancement) and Benevolence (a more moral and caring community), rivalled climate change importance in the strength of their relationships with motivations to act. These co-benefits showed effects independent of climate change importance beliefs, and showed similar effects for both climate change believers and skeptics. Communicating these co-benefits of addressing climate change can help motivate action on climate change where traditional approaches have stalled.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences > School of Hospitality and Tourism Management
Authors :
AuthorsEmailORCID
Bain, PGUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Milfont, TLUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Kashima, YUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Bilewicz, MUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Doron, GUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Garðarsdóttir, RBUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Gouveia, VVUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Guan, YUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Johansson, LUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Pasquali, CUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Verdugo, VUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Aragones, JIUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Utsugi, AUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Demarque, CUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Otto, SUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Park, JUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Soland, MUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Steg, LUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
González, RUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Lebedeva, NUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Madsen, OJUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Wagner, CUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Akotia, CSUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Kurz, TUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Saiz, JLUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Schultz, PWUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Einarsdóttir, GUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Saviolidis, NMUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : 28 September 2015
Identification Number : 10.1038/nclimate2814
Related URLs :
Additional Information : Copyright 2015 Nature Publishing Group
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 06 Oct 2015 17:53
Last Modified : 28 Mar 2016 01:08
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/808714

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