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Global inequities and emissions in Western European textiles and clothing consumption

Mair, S, Druckman, A and Jackson, T (2015) Global inequities and emissions in Western European textiles and clothing consumption Journal of Cleaner Production.

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Abstract

© 2015 Elsevier Ltd. Rising demand for cheaper textiles and clothing in Western Europe is well documented, as are changes in the Textiles and Clothing industry's globalised production structure. We apply a sub-systems global multi-regional input-output accounting framework to examine the sustainability implications of meeting Western European demand for textiles and clothing goods between 1995 and 2009. Our framework estimates environmental and socio-economic impacts of consumption in a consistent manner and shows where these occur both geographically and in the value chain. The results demonstrate that Western European textiles and clothing consumption remains dependent on low-cost labour from Brazil, Russia, India and China (BRIC), principally in the Textiles and Clothing and Agricultural sectors. Conversely, we show that the wage rate for BRIC workers in the global value chains serving Western European textiles and clothing consumption has risen over time but remains low relative to the wage rate paid to Western European workers. Likewise, we find that profits are increasingly generated within BRIC and that they are now at comparable levels to those generated in Western Europe. We find a slight overall decrease in the amount of carbon emitted in the production of textiles and clothing goods for Western Europe between 1995 and 2009. However, the trend is not linear and the importance of different underlying drivers varies over the timeseries. We conclude by discussing the implications of these results for a more sustainable future for Western European textiles and clothing consumption.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences > Centre for Environmental Strategy
Authors :
AuthorsEmailORCID
Mair, SUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Druckman, AUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Jackson, TUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : 28 August 2015
Identification Number : 10.1016/j.jclepro.2015.08.082
Additional Information : © 2015. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 10 Nov 2015 11:53
Last Modified : 28 Aug 2016 01:08
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/808643

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