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Monte Carlo Simulations for the Detection of Buried Objects Using Single Sided Backscattered Radiation.

Yip, M, Saripan, MI, Wells, K and Bradley, DA (2015) Monte Carlo Simulations for the Detection of Buried Objects Using Single Sided Backscattered Radiation. PLoS One, 10 (9).

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Detection of buried improvised explosive devices (IEDs) is a delicate task, leading to a need to develop sensitive stand-off detection technology. The shape, composition and size of the IEDs can be expected to be revised over time in an effort to overcome increasingly sophisticated detection methods. As an example, for the most part, landmines are found through metal detection which has led to increasing use of non-ferrous materials such as wood or plastic containers for chemical based explosives being developed. METHODOLOGY: Monte Carlo simulations have been undertaken considering three different commercially available detector materials (hyperpure-Ge (HPGe), lanthanum(III) bromide (LaBr) and thallium activated sodium iodide (NaI(Tl)), applied at a stand-off distance of 50 cm from the surface and burial depths of 0, 5 and 10 cm, with sand as the obfuscating medium. Target materials representing medium density wood and mild steel have been considered. Each detector has been modelled as a 10 cm thick cylinder with a 20 cm diameter. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: It appears that HPGe represents the most promising detector for this application. Although it was not the highest density material studied, its excellent energy resolving capability leads to the highest quality spectra from which detection decisions can be inferred. CONCLUSIONS: The simulation work undertaken here suggests that a vehicle-born threat detection system could be envisaged using a single betatron and a series of detectors operating in parallel observing the space directly in front of the vehicle path. Furthermore, results show that non-ferrous materials such as wood can be effectively discerned in such remote-operated detection system, with the potential to apply a signature analysis template matching technique for real-time analysis of such data.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences
Authors :
AuthorsEmailORCID
Yip, MUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Saripan, MIUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Wells, KUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Bradley, DAUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : 2015
Identification Number : 10.1371/journal.pone.0135769
Related URLs :
Additional Information : © 2015 Yip et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 06 Nov 2015 13:00
Last Modified : 06 Nov 2015 13:00
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/808639

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