University of Surrey

Test tubes in the lab Research in the ATI Dance Research

Water Vapor Sorption and Diffusion in Secondary Dispersion Barrier Coatings: A Critical Comparison with Emulsion Polymers

Liu, Y, Soer, W-J, Scheerder, J, Satgurunathan, G and Keddie, JL (2015) Water Vapor Sorption and Diffusion in Secondary Dispersion Barrier Coatings: A Critical Comparison with Emulsion Polymers ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, 7 (22). pp. 12147-12157.

[img]
Preview
Text
Water Vapour Sorption - ACS-AMI -SRI.pdf - Accepted version Manuscript
Available under License : See the attached licence file.

Download (948kB) | Preview
[img]
Preview
Text (licence)
SRI_deposit_agreement.pdf
Available under License : See the attached licence file.

Download (33kB) | Preview
[img]
Preview
Text
Supporting Information-Final-v2.pdf - Supplemental Material
Available under License : See the attached licence file.

Download (934kB) | Preview

Abstract

The conventional method for synthesizing waterborne polymer colloids is emulsion polymerization using surfactants. An emerging method is the use of secondary dispersions (SD) of polymers in water, which avoids the addition of any surfactant. Although there are numerous studies of the water barrier properties (sorption, diffusion, and permeability) of waterborne emulsion (Em) polymer coatings, the properties of SD coatings, in comparison, have not been thoroughly investigated. Here, dynamic water vapor sorption analysis is used to compare the equilibrium sorption isotherms of the two forms of styrene-acrylate copolymers (Em and SD) with the same monomer composition. From an analysis of the kinetics of vapor sorption, the diffusion coefficient of water in the polymer coatings is determined. The combined effects of particle boundaries and surfactant addition were investigated through a comparison of the properties of SD and Em coatings to those of (1) solvent-cast polymer coatings (of the same monomer composition), (2) Em polymers that underwent dialysis to partially remove the water-soluble species, and (3) SD polymers with added surfactants. The results reveal that both the particle boundaries and the surfactants increase vapor sorption. The diffusion coefficients of water are comparable in magnitude in all of the polymer systems but are inversely related to water activity because of molecular clustering. Compared to all of the other waterborne polymer systems, the SD barrier coatings show the lowest equilibrium vapor sorption and permeability coefficients at high relative humidities as well as the lowest water diffusion coefficient at low humidities. These barrier properties make SD coatings an attractive alternative to conventional emulsion polymer coatings.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences > Physics
Authors :
AuthorsEmailORCID
Liu, YUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Soer, W-JUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Scheerder, JUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Satgurunathan, GUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Keddie, JLUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : 1 June 2015
Identification Number : 10.1021/acsami.5b02446
Uncontrolled Keywords : Science & Technology, Technology, Nanoscience & Nanotechnology, Materials Science, Multidisciplinary, Science & Technology - Other Topics, Materials Science, secondary dispersion, surfactant-free, barrier coatings, sorption isotherms, latex films, water diffusion coefficients, emulsion polymers, PROTECTIVE ORGANIC COATINGS, LATEX FILMS, GLASSY-POLYMERS, PERMEABILITY, POLYMERIZATION, SENSITIVITY, TRANSPORT, SYSTEMS, SURFACTANTS, ISOTHERMS
Related URLs :
Additional Information : This document is the Accepted Manuscript version of a Published Work that appeared in final form in ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, © 2015 American Chemical Society after peer review and technical editing by the publisher.To access the final edited and published work see 10.1021/acsami.5b02446.
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 20 Oct 2015 13:08
Last Modified : 01 Jun 2016 01:08
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/808623

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year


Information about this web site

© The University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH, United Kingdom.
+44 (0)1483 300800