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A qualitative exploration of how people with learning disabilities understand and respond to bullying.

Byrne, Frederick T. (2015) A qualitative exploration of how people with learning disabilities understand and respond to bullying. Doctoral thesis, University of Surrey.

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Abstract

Despite reports that people with learning disabilities (PWLD) are more vulnerable to being bullied than the non-LD population, there is a paucity of research into bullying of PWLD. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 20 adults with LD, using bullying vignettes, to explore how PWLD understand bullying; their knowledge of coping strategies for dealing with bullying; and what PWLD understand the consequences of bullying to be. Interview data was analysed using thematic analysis and categorised into four super-ordinate themes; Bullying is a bad thing; Reasons for the bullying; Coping strategies; and Consequences of own bullying experiences. The findings are discussed in relation to attribution theory (Heider, 1958) and socio-moral reasoning theory (Gibbs, 1979; 2003). Recommendations for clinicians working with PWLD involved in bullying are made; including considering the application of the concept of the “provocative-victim” (Sheard, Clegg, Standen, & Cromby, 2001); exploring how individual’s understanding of bullying experiences in terms of attributions made and socio-moral reasoning; exploring coping strategies and addressing aggressive or avoidance-based strategies, and consequences of bullying such as social and psychological problems. Recommendations are made for future research with larger, more representative samples.

Item Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Psychology
Authors :
AuthorsEmailORCID
Byrne, Frederick T.fredbyrne@live.comUNSPECIFIED
Date : 28 August 2015
Funders : Universiy of Surrey, Surrey and Borders Partnership Trust
Contributors :
ContributionNameEmailORCID
Thesis supervisorUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Depositing User : Frederick Byrne
Date Deposited : 08 Sep 2015 07:40
Last Modified : 31 Aug 2016 01:08
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/808346

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