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Modifying polyester surfaces with incompatible polymer additives

James, CD, Jeynes, C, Barradas, NP, Clifton, L, Dalgliesh, RM, Smith, RF, Sankey, SW, Hutchings, LR and Thompson, RL (2015) Modifying polyester surfaces with incompatible polymer additives REACTIVE & FUNCTIONAL POLYMERS, 89. pp. 40-48.

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Abstract

Surface modification of amorphous PET in incompatible blends is demonstrated using fluorocarbon end-functional polystyrenes. Contact angles with water and decane were consistent with high levels of surface fluorocarbon, even for spin-cast films with no further processing required. Hydrophobicity and lipophobicity were further increased by annealing above the glass transition temperature. High resolution depth profiling using complementary ion beam analysis and specular neutron reflectometry has enabled accurate characterisation of the composition profile of the additive including the minimum in additive concentration found just below the surface enriched layer. This analysis quantified the very low compatibility between the modifying polymer and the amorphous PET and was consistent with the highly segregated nature of the adsorbing species and its sharp interface with the subphase. For these incompatible polymer blends, surfaces enriched with the surface active polymer could coexist at equilibrium with extremely low (∼0.4%) bulk loadings of the additive. This suggests that for thicker films at even lower additive concentrations than the minimum 1% that we studied, it may be possible to achieve efficient surface modification. However, at this concentration, the efficiency of surface modification is limited by the processing conditions. Finally we note that in higher loadings of surface active additive there is clear evidence for lateral phase separation into patterned domains of differing composition. The enhancement in surface properties is due to local reorganisation rather than bulk redistribution of the components within the film, as the composition versus depth distributions of the polymer blend components was observed to be relatively unaffected by annealing.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences > Electronic Engineering > Advanced Technology Institute > Ion Beam Centre
Authors :
AuthorsEmailORCID
James, CDUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Jeynes, CUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Barradas, NPUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Clifton, LUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Dalgliesh, RMUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Smith, RFUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Sankey, SWUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Hutchings, LRUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Thompson, RLUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : 1 April 2015
Identification Number : 10.1016/j.reactfunctpolym.2015.03.002
Uncontrolled Keywords : Science & Technology, Physical Sciences, Technology, Chemistry, Applied, Engineering, Chemical, Polymer Science, Chemistry, Engineering, Polyester, Blends, Surfaces, Scattering, Reflectometry, DIRECTED SPINODAL DECOMPOSITION, INTERFACES, POLYETHYLENE, SEGREGATION, COPOLYMER, BEHAVIOR, BLENDS, ADSORPTION, KINETICS, COATINGS
Related URLs :
Additional Information : © 2015. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 21 Aug 2015 16:50
Last Modified : 01 Oct 2016 01:08
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/808307

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