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Respite care for patients with neuro-degenerative diseases.

Laverty, Diane (2015) Respite care for patients with neuro-degenerative diseases. Doctoral thesis, University of Surrey.

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Respite Care for Patients with Neuro-Degenerative Diseases. THESIS PART ONE (FINAL).pdf - Thesis (version of record)
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Abstract

Aim: This study aimed to develop a grounded theory to explain the experience of patients with neurodegenerative diseases and their carers, following an episode of residential respite care. Background: Neurodegenerative diseases are incurable, debilitating and result in progressive deterioration of the patient which present as problems with cognitive functioning (dementias) and/or physical functioning (ataxias). To allow quality of life and purpose for the patient and caregiver, as well as providing value for money, respite is an area of care which could offer the patient rehabilitation, maximisation of functionality and quality of life; relief from caregiving duties for the carer and signposting for additional assistance and support. Methods: This was a qualitative, grounded theory study conducted across south east England. An initial audit, attendance at support groups and specialist clinics provided scoping of the scale of the problems encountered by this patient population. Data collection included 17 semi structured interviews conducted with patients and carers who had recently received residential respite, non-participant observation at a hospice offering dedicated respite care and 4 hospice staff interviews. Findings: A successful respite depended on the patient and carer identifying the need for respite and the information required to determine where, what, when and how respite could be accessed. The logistics of the referral process, preparation for respite and the handover of care needs to professionals were key factors for a therapeutic admission. Conclusion: The outcomes from the respite admission should be mutually acceptable to both the patient and carer and be able to demonstrate acceptance and adaptation to a new normalcy, influenced by disease progression and reflecting on time present and time past. The onward journey sees a transitioning which involves restoration and building up a level of resilience for the carer, which all contribute to sustainability and being able to continue in the caring role.

Item Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Divisions : Theses
Authors :
AuthorsEmailORCID
Laverty, Dianediane.laverty@ntlworld.comUNSPECIFIED
Date : 28 August 2015
Funders : Motor Neurone Disease Association
Contributors :
ContributionNameEmailORCID
Thesis supervisorFaithfull, Saras.faithfull@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Thesis supervisorArber, Annea.arber@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Depositing User : Diane Laverty
Date Deposited : 05 Aug 2015 10:41
Last Modified : 08 Sep 2015 08:58
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/808253

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