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Molecular epidemiology of ascariasis: a global perspective on the transmission dynamics of Ascaris in people and pigs.

Betson, M, Nejsum, P, Bendall, RP, Deb, RM and Stothard, JR (2014) Molecular epidemiology of ascariasis: a global perspective on the transmission dynamics of Ascaris in people and pigs. J Infect Dis, 210 (6). pp. 932-941.

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: The roundworm Ascaris lumbricoides infects 0.8 billion people worldwide, and Ascaris suum infects innumerable pigs across the globe. The extent of natural cross-transmission of Ascaris between pig and human hosts in different geographical settings is unknown, warranting investigation. METHODS: Adult Ascaris organisms were obtained from humans and pigs in Europe, Africa, Asia, and Latin America. Barcodes were assigned to 536 parasites on the basis of sequence analysis of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I gene. Genotyping of 410 worms was also conducted using a panel of microsatellite markers. Phylogenetic, population genetic, and Bayesian assignment methods were used for analysis. RESULTS: There was marked genetic segregation between worms originating from human hosts and those originating from pig hosts. However, human Ascaris infections in Europe were of pig origin, and there was evidence of cross-transmission between humans and pigs in Africa. Significant genetic differentiation exists between parasite populations from different countries, villages, and hosts. CONCLUSIONS: In conducting an analysis of variation within Ascaris populations from pig and human hosts across the globe, we demonstrate that cross-transmission takes place in developing and developed countries, contingent upon epidemiological potential and local phylogeography. Our results provide novel insights into the transmission dynamics and speciation of Ascaris worms from humans and pigs that are of importance for control programs.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences
Authors :
AuthorsEmailORCID
Betson, MUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Nejsum, PUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Bendall, RPUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Deb, RMUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Stothard, JRUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : 15 September 2014
Identification Number : 10.1093/infdis/jiu193
Uncontrolled Keywords : Ascaris, barcode, giant roundworm, microsatellite, neglected tropical disease, population genetics, soil-transmitted helminth, zoonosis, Animals, Ascariasis, Ascaris, Cyclooxygenase 1, DNA, Helminth, Haplotypes, Humans, Microsatellite Repeats, Molecular Epidemiology, Swine, Swine Diseases, Zoonoses
Related URLs :
Additional Information : © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 11 Aug 2015 14:24
Last Modified : 11 Aug 2015 14:24
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/808134

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