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New insights into the molecular epidemiology and population genetics of Schistosoma mansoni in Ugandan pre-school children and mothers.

Betson, M, Sousa-Figueiredo, JC, Kabatereine, NB and Stothard, JR (2013) New insights into the molecular epidemiology and population genetics of Schistosoma mansoni in Ugandan pre-school children and mothers. PLoS neglected tropical diseases, 7 (12).

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Abstract

Significant numbers of pre-school children are infected with Schistosoma mansoni in sub-Saharan Africa and are likely to play a role in parasite transmission. However, they are currently excluded from control programmes. Molecular phylogenetic studies have provided insights into the evolutionary origins and transmission dynamics of S. mansoni, but there has been no research into schistosome molecular epidemiology in pre-school children. Here, we investigated the genetic diversity and population structure of S. mansoni in pre-school children and mothers living in lakeshore communities in Uganda and monitored for changes over time after praziquantel treatment. Parasites were sampled from children (<6 years) and mothers enrolled in the longitudinal Schistosomiasis Mothers and Infants Study at baseline and at 6-, 12- and 18-month follow-up surveys. 1347 parasites from 35 mothers and 45 children were genotyped by direct sequencing of the cytochrome c oxidase (cox1) gene. The cox1 region was highly diverse with over 230 unique sequences identified. Parasite populations were genetically differentiated between lakes and non-synonymous mutations were more diverse at Lake Victoria than Lake Albert. Surprisingly, parasite populations sampled from children showed a similar genetic diversity to those sampled from mothers, pointing towards a non-linear relationship between duration of exposure and accumulation of parasite diversity. The genetic diversity six months after praziquantel treatment was similar to pre-treatment diversity. Our results confirm the substantial genetic diversity of S. mansoni in East Africa and provide significant insights into transmission dynamics within young children and mothers, important information for schistosomiasis control programmes.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences
Authors :
AuthorsEmailORCID
Betson, MUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Sousa-Figueiredo, JCUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Kabatereine, NBUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Stothard, JRUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : 12 December 2013
Identification Number : 10.1371/journal.pntd.0002561
Uncontrolled Keywords : Africa, Animals, Anthelmintics, Child, Preschool, Electron Transport Complex IV, Family Health, Female, Genetic Variation, Genetics, Population, Genotype, Humans, Infant, Longitudinal Studies, Male, Molecular Epidemiology, Molecular Sequence Data, Mothers, Praziquantel, Schistosoma mansoni, Schistosomiasis mansoni, Sequence Analysis, DNA, Uganda
Related URLs :
Additional Information : Copyright: 2013 Betson et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 11 Aug 2015 14:46
Last Modified : 11 Aug 2015 14:46
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/808130

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