University of Surrey

Test tubes in the lab Research in the ATI Dance Research

Closing the praziquantel treatment gap: new steps in epidemiological monitoring and control of schistosomiasis in African infants and preschool-aged children.

Stothard, JR, Sousa-Figueiredo, JC, Betson, M, Green, HK, Seto, EY, Garba, A, Sacko, M, Mutapi, F, Vaz Nery, S, Amin, MA, Mutumba-Nakalembe, M, Navaratnam, A, Fenwick, A, Kabatereine, NB, Gabrielli, AF and Montresor, A (2011) Closing the praziquantel treatment gap: new steps in epidemiological monitoring and control of schistosomiasis in African infants and preschool-aged children. Parasitology, 138 (12). pp. 1593-1606.

[img]
Preview
Text
Closing the praziquantel treatment gap: new steps in epidemiological monitoring and control of schistosomiasis in African infants and preschool-aged children..pdf
Available under License : See the attached licence file.

Download (793kB) | Preview
[img]
Preview
Text (licence)
SRI_deposit_agreement.pdf
Available under License : See the attached licence file.

Download (33kB) | Preview

Abstract

Where very young children come into contact with water containing schistosome cercariae, infections occur and schistosomiasis can be found. In high transmission environments, where mothers daily bathe their children with environmentally drawn water, many infants and preschool-aged children have schistosomiasis. This 'new' burden, inclusive of co-infections with Schistosoma haematobium and Schistosoma mansoni, is being formally explored as infected children are not presently targeted to receive praziquantel (PZQ) within current preventive chemotherapy campaigns. Thus an important PZQ treatment gap exists whereby infected children might wait up to 4-5 years before receiving first treatment in school. International treatment guidelines, set within national treatment platforms, are presently being modified to provide earlier access to medication(s). Although detailed pharmacokinetic studies are needed, to facilitate pragmatic dosing in the field, an extended 'dose pole' has been devised and epidemiological monitoring has shown that administration of PZQ (40 mg/kg), in either crushed tablet or liquid suspension, is both safe and effective in this younger age-class; drug efficacy, however, against S. mansoni appears to diminish after repeated rounds of treatment. Thus use of PZQ should be combined with appropriate health education/water hygiene improvements for both child and mother to bring forth a more enduring solution.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences
Authors :
AuthorsEmailORCID
Stothard, JRUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Sousa-Figueiredo, JCUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Betson, MUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Green, HKUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Seto, EYUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Garba, AUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Sacko, MUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Mutapi, FUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Vaz Nery, SUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Amin, MAUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Mutumba-Nakalembe, MUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Navaratnam, AUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Fenwick, AUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Kabatereine, NBUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Gabrielli, AFUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Montresor, AUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : October 2011
Identification Number : 10.1017/S0031182011001235
Uncontrolled Keywords : Africa, Age Factors, Anemia, Animals, Anthelmintics, Child, Preschool, Coinfection, Feces, Female, Hepatomegaly, Humans, Infant, Praziquantel, Prevalence, Schistosomiasis haematobia, Schistosomiasis mansoni, Splenomegaly, Water
Related URLs :
Additional Information : © Cambridge University Press 2011. The online version of this article is published within an Open Access environment subject to the conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike licence <http:// creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.5/>. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use.
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 14 Aug 2015 09:43
Last Modified : 14 Aug 2015 09:43
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/808125

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year


Information about this web site

© The University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH, United Kingdom.
+44 (0)1483 300800